Kettering Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Kettering Golf Club

About Kettering Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Kettering Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Kettering Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Kettering Golf Club

It was due to the initiative and enthusiasm of Dr. John Allison that golf was introduced into Kettering and a golf club formed in 1891. Dr. John Allison arrived in Kettering in 1889 from Coldstream in Berwickshire. He qualified in Edinburgh, and then worked as a house surgeon at the Edinburgh Royal Infirmary. In Kettering he became the senior practitioner during a career which lasted until he retired in 1930.

Kettering Golf Club

Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

Train yourself to see imaginary holes (at adjusted distances) by using the Phony-Hole on two-tier practice greens. Lay the Phony-Hole in front of (or behind) the real cup and imagine you are putting on a level surface to it when you take your practice stroke looks to determine your preview stroke. It will take only a few minutes of practice to learn how far behind or ahead of the real hole the Phony-Hole should be placed to get good results.

13.3 Refine Your Feel

Now that you have good touch you need good feel to be able to transform what your touch tells you is needed into a stroke that feels right and that you believe will provide the perfect roll (speed and distance) required.

Remember touch is knowing “what” to do while feel is knowing “how” to do it. So when you practice feel you must assume you already know what is needed (the size of the required stroke) and you’re trying to create the how (feel) to do it. Although this assumption isn’t always the case on the course (sometimes your touch gives you its best estimate of what is needed but you doubt its accuracy) you

Develop Your Artistic Senses (Feel Touch Green-Reading) 313 must trust your touch when you practice feel on the putting green. This means feel practice should be very repetitive internalizing the process of producing a given stroke and roll after you know the power and distance needed for that putt.

To practice feel you must practice using your mind’s-eye memories and prior training to visualize how the stroke should look and feel to create optimum distance and speed. Knowing this relationship is your feel in putting. You then can recognize a job well done by the good feeling you get as you swing through impact and reach the end of your follow-through. You’ll know even before looking up to see where the ball has gone: If you feel “Ahhh yes that’s as good as I can stroke it; I made an exact repeat of my preview stroke and that’s the exact stroke I wanted to put on the ball ” then you know you did a good job feeling the putt.

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

The Stimpmeter developed years ago by a man named Edward Stimpson is a crude yet simple way to measure how far a ball will roll on a flat portion of a green when it is given a standard starting speed. The USGA-approved version of a

Stimpmeter is a solid straight piece of aluminum extruded at a 30-degree angle with an indentation near the top and a beveled bottom (Figure 4.3.2). The beveled bottom allows the Stimpmeter to sit low to the green surface and reduce the bounce of a ball rolling down the channel when it hits the green.

The Stimpmeter was designed to release balls onto a green surface with constant initial speed (energy).

Measuring Green Speed To use a Stimpmeter a ball is placed in the indentation and the device is raised slowly until the ball rolls free and down the groove onto the green (Figure 4.3.3). Care must he taken to hold the Stimpmeter still as the ball rolls down the ramp to ensure constant release energy and ball speed at the bottom of the ramp.

To measure green speed three balls are rolled in one direction on the green measuring how far each ball rolls (in feet) from the end of the Stimpmeter. The same three balls then are rolled in the opposite direction over the same section of the green and again the distances are measured. The six distances are averaged to produce a quantitative measurement of the average distance a ball rolls on that green called the green speed. A slow green is about a 7 (meaning the balls rolled an average of 7 feet) while a fast green comes in at about a 10. Most PGA tournaments aim for green speeds between 10.5 and 11. When greens start rolling at 12 to 13 they are called “Augusta fast ” because that’s often the speed of the greens at Augusta National Golf Club home of The Masters every spring.

Longer rolls (from higher green speeds) for longer times mean the friction of

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 63 the green surface is low letting balls roll farther and longer. A rapidly slowing and short roll off a Stimpmeter means the friction of the green surface is high and the green speed is very slow.

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Kettering Golf Club

Start your backswing. Focus on keeping your back straight, and your chest out. To help you swing directly around your spine, try focusing on rotating your right shoulder back and around your spine. If you focus on the right shoulder, your left shoulder will be in the correct position automatically. Simple. Keep your left elbow locked.

Kettering Golf Club