Keswick Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Keswick Golf Club

About Keswick Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Keswick Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Keswick Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Keswick Golf Club

Cumbria has many great sports clubs and Keswick Golf Club is no exception. Located 4 miles East of Keswick on Derwentwater in the heart of the Lake District, the golf course is easily approached from the A66 at Threlkeld – the main route from Penrith to the West Coast.The golf club is renowned for its outstanding Lakeland views and superb facilities. Sitting on Threlkeld Common the course has scenic panoramic views of Blencathra – one of England’s highest mountains – Skiddaw, Clough Head and other North Lakeland fells. Please visit our panoramic page where you will see the sights for yourself through our golf course virtual tours.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

Green-Reading the 15th Building Block 155 because the balls don’t stay on those lines long enough to be seen there; gravity immediately pulls the ball down the slope to the ball track. Please notice here and this is important that this putt did start correctly on the perfect Aimline as if a golfer had putted it perfectly on a line aimed 36 inches above the hole (a close-up view of the initial roll is shown on the right). But even when pulls start rolling perfectly playing for the correct amount of break (in this case 36 inches) gravity pulls them down to roll along their ball tracks showing golfers only 12 inches of visible break above the ball-hole line. So the golfer even when he compensates perfectly and pulls it perfectly never sees how high he actually started the ball rolling and thinks he started it 12 inches above the hole.

So this is the key point: Putts never stay on the line you (or the True Roller) start them on; they always get pulled downhill and show you only the visible break which you wrongly assume is where you putted them.

There will always be a theoretical line called your Aimline (aiming at the true break point) on which you want to start your putts. But as soon as you do gravity will pull them off that line and down the slope. No balls will ever roll up to or even near the true break point. The only way a putt ever continues to roll in its initial-starting-line direction is if the green is dead flat and the putt rolls dead straight. No breaking putts stay on their initial Aimlines (starting lines) long enough for golfers to see those lines. Even when their subconscious (by pulling or pushing) starts putts on the correct line (true-break-point Aimline) golfers never see them there. Golfers assume they start their putts on the lines they think they aimed at (where they see them) which we call the “visible-break ball track” (Figure 7.7.3). And because no balls ever roll along the true break Aimline and there is nothing to show us its location true break is for all intents and purposes invisible to golfers. With nothing to mark it we don’t sec it. It ‘s invisible.

I Never Realized This Myself

I’ d done all the research. I’d known for years that golfers were under-reading the true break in putts. I’d been pleading begging my students to look at their putts and watch how much they broke to learn they needed to play three times as much break as they used to think they were playing. I promised that if they did they could stop their subconscious compensations and they would make more putts. But I’d been asking them the whole time to putt along a line they had no chance to see because it is invisible to them.

It was a day in the fall of 1999. As I watched putts roll over and over through our hole bridge which marks the hole for putts without affecting their roll as shown in Figure 7.7.4 (on left) on a perfect ball track I realized that no ball ever

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

Any putting stroke that swings in an arc suspended from somewhere around your sternum (or some other spot between your shoulders) will have a bottom to its arc a low point a place where the sole of the club is closest to the ground. I have found that the best place to position the ball in your stance is approximately two inches ahead of this bottom point. At this spot you have the best chance of striking the ball on an ever-so-slight upward arc as your putter comes up from its lowest point (Figure 4.10.1). Striking the ball slightly on the upswing gets putts rolling on top of the grass without lofting them too high which produces bounce or hitting them down into the surface of the green so they squirt off to the right or left.

Of course where your putter contacts the ball also depends on the effective loft of the putterface at the moment of impact. In Figure 4.10.2 the center ball is being struck slightly on the upswing by a putter with a small amount of loft so it starts on top of the grass with almost no spin. This is the ideal situation. The other

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 95 balls in this illustration also are struck at the same point in the stroke but are launched upward or down and receive more spin because there is more or less loft on the putterface. Since true overspin backspin and bouncing do nothing but make putts roll less consistently and spin effects are long gone before the ball reaches the hole there is no reason to try for anything other than rolling the ball on top of the grass with minimum spin.

Again there is one exception to this and again as mentioned earlier with respect to the sweetspot’s two dimensions it is when the greens are very bumpy and soft. In these conditions I sometimes recommend that players use a more lofted putter move the ball slightly forward in their stance (increasing the effective loft at impact by catching the putt more on the upstroke) or both. You can see this every year at the AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am which is held in late winter. The greens are always soft and bumpy due to rain and the large field of amateurs and pros filling three courses every day. By the time our team gets to Pebble for the third round of the tournament the footprints are really bad.

Despite these conditions using slightly more loft might help explain why my man Jack Lemmon (the “human hinge”) always putts so well in that tournament (Figure 4.10.3). (Peter Jacobsen eat your heart out!)

The angle between your back and your hips should be great enough to provide room for your arms to swing with your hands vertically below your shoulders but small enough to let you comfortably practice putting at least 10 or 15 minutes at a time (Figure 4.10.4 middle photograph). Your knees should be slightly flexed enough to give you stability on windy days without making you feel crouched or uncomfortable.

The most comfortable and solid putting posture sets your center of mass (the center of your weight) over a spot between the balls of your feet as shown in Figure 4.10.5. Leaning too far forward so your weight gets out over your toes can cause severe inconsistencies in the impact point of your putts. Leaning too far back away from the ball places too much weight on your heels which leads to instability particularly in windy conditions again hindering solid and repeatable impact.

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Keswick Golf Club

Now that you have the proper grip with your left hand, we can focus on the right hand. Take your right hand and place it underneath the handle of the club. Lift up your left forefinger from underneath the club so it can move freely. Interlock your right picky with your left forefinger.

Keswick Golf Club