Kenilworth Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Kenilworth Golf Club

About Kenilworth Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Kenilworth Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Kenilworth Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Kenilworth Golf Club

Our 18 hole scenic parkland course – at around 6300 yards, Par 71 and with an SSS of 70 – provides a good challenge for low handicap golfers without unfairly penalising or intimidating everyone else. Testament to this, and to the excellent bar and restaurant facilities available, is our ever increasing popularity with visiting societies as well as regular requests to host major amateur competitions such as The Midlands Open and both men’s and women’s Inter County matches.

Kenilworth Golf Club

Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

8.6 17 Inches Past Is Key

Go back to what I said a few pages ago about there being an optimum putting speed for every putt. Your next questions probably are: (1) What is this optimum speed? and (2) How do you learn to roll your putts at that speed?

Let’s start with finding it. I’ve tested for optimum speeds on different putts and different greens all around the country. Using the True Roller I’ve found the line and speed that make the highest percentage of putts then covered the hole (as shown in Figure 8.6.1) rolled more putts at that speed and measured how far these optimum speed putts roll past the hole. What does measuring this distance do? It produces a quantifiable and visual result that you can use to evaluate the speed of your putts on any green anywhere relative to the optimum speed that has the best chance of holing putts.

It’s important to note here that I’m referring not to a speed but a distance past the hole. As I mentioned earlier golfers don’t relate to speeds (velocities) which change from green to green depending on the conditions anyway. But what does not change (at least not very much) is the distance the optimum speed putts roll past the hole which is in a general way a measure of how fast the ball was rolling when it reached the cup after passing through the lumpy donut. That distance is 17 inches. Years of experiments have shown me that the optimum speed for making putts is one that would if the hole were covered or missed roll the ball 17 inches past the back edge. That extra 17 inches of speed is enough to keep the maximum percentage of putts on line through the lumpy donut yet not so fast they won’t stay in the hole when they hit it.

Speed Is More Important Than Line 191

Something Extra for the Technically Oriented

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

Opening or closing your stance by moving your feet off the flow-line is accept able but not recommended. Because your stance can affect your shoulder align ment and the line of your shoulders is vital to good putting I normally recom mend setting the feet square. Of course it is possible to move your feet open or closed without moving your shoulders. Just be sure your shoulder flow-line re mains parallel-left to your Aimline.

My measurements also show that many of the world’s best putters create a stable lower body by placing slightly more than half – 55 to 60 percent – of their weight on their forward foot.

Elbows

Something else to watch out for in your putting stroke motion is any change in your elbow angles. I am told that early in the career of Arnold Palmer his father

Deacon told him the secret to putting was to keep his putter low going back and low coming through. However the only way you can keep the club low to the ground is to extend and contract your elbows: Extend them during your back- swing contract them as you swing through impact then extend them again on your follow-through. I believe this complex set of motions – plus a propensity to power his putts with a wrist hinge – is what destroyed Arnold’s putting in the latter portion of his career.

I don’t mean to criticize Arnold or Deacon Palmer because Arnold putted well enough to be one of the best players of all time. But I’m convinced that with his fantastic imagination talent and competitive instincts (he certainly never had the best golf swing) he would have been even more dominant and for a longer time if he had used a simpler putting stroke and been a better putter.

The Grip: Light Is Better Than Tight

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Kenilworth Golf Club

First of all, it’s important that you realize that your grip will affect the results that you get. However, it’s not as complicated as the other systems make it out to be. First, grab the club with your right hand so the face of it is toward the target. Keep the face pointed toward the target, while placing your left hand on the bottom of the grip or handle. At this point you should be holding your left hand out flat, so that it is touching the bottom of the grip. Position the joint where your left pinky meets your palm directly underneath the handle of the club. Keep the pinky there and place the first joint in your left forefinger directly underneath the club. Now, do not lift your fingers up, bringing the grip of the club into your palm; instead, hold the handle steady with your left fingers and wrap your palm around the top of the grip. This is an important distinction. Again, don’t wrap the fingers towards the palm, but instead wrap your palm around the top of the club. Now, you should be able to easily place your left thumb directly on top of the club. This should form a V-shape where your left thumb and left forefinger meet. This V-shape should point directly to your right shoulder when it’s complete.

Kenilworth Golf Club