Kedleston Park Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Kedleston Park Golf Club

About Kedleston Park Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Kedleston Park Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Kedleston Park Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Kedleston Park Golf Club

Kedleston Park is an 18 hole members course laid out in 155 acres of the mature parkland surrounding Kedleston Hall.Kedleston Hall, a National Trust property, is a Palladian Mansion built for the Curzon Family in the 18th century by Robert Adam. The course enjoys many scenic views over the surrounding park.Our clubhouse has two bars and an air-conditioned restaurant, with excellent views over the course with Kedleston Hall beyond.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

It does my heart good to see young golfers putt well and I always encourage parents to send their children to one of my schools while they arc young so they learn what they need to learn to become and remain good putters for life. But don’t take initial good putting by a junior to mean he or she has God-given putting talent (Figure 15.5.1). I can’t tell you how many adults used to be good putters until they lost it (a little bad practice is all it takes).

Here are some ways to help your kids become good putters forever:

380 Wrap-Up fundamentals of good putting they can keep getting better as they age and that is fun! right from the start. Keep their putters short rather than too long and keep changing putters as they grow so the same (presumably correct) putting stroke continues to work.

6. Start teaching kids golf on the green. Let them get comfortable with putting first then move them progressively back ending at the driving range. (Unfortunately most golf instruction is just the opposite. Giving them the satisfaction of seeing the ball go into the hole first is important to both their learning and long-term success.)

It does my heart even better to see older golfers putt well (Figure 15.5.2). If you’re no longer a kid and you want to improve your putting here’s sonic inspiration:

1. Never give up on putting well:

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

The Hit Stroke

Let me explain what this “dead-hands” stroke is not. It is not your natural stroke because most golfers’ natural instinct is to “hit” a putt with the muscles of the fingers hands and wrists. Our instincts are developed in our childhood when we play games that involve hitting things turning knobs and manipulating pushing and controlling the objects in our lives with our fingers hands and wrists. This also is the way most people putt because they consider it to be natural. But just because it’s natural does not make it either the right way or the best way.

But golfers hit their putts (Figure 5.3.1). And when a ball is hit the distance it rolls depends on how hard it is hit. The power of the putt depends on the energy or effort put into the stroke. And therein lies the problem: You can’t see or feel the power of a hit before it happens. No matter how much a golfer practices hitting putts the right distance and speed when he or she gets under pressure and tries to apply the same hit to the ball with adrenaline-filled muscles the results will be wrong. Once again as the muscles get stronger the same feel that produced good results in practice produces a more powerful hit under pressure.

Many low-handicap amateurs fall into this trap. They practice with the belief that the harder and longer they work the better they’ll putt under pressure. They believe that putting well under pressure involves courage strength of conviction or some other inner quality of the heart. I suppose these character traits are admirable but they have nothing to do with how far the ball rolls in good putting. If you insist on hitting your putts and controlling your putt distance with your muscles then the only way to practice feel and touch is under pressure. The good player can accomplish this by playing in tournaments in which he is likely to face many pressure putts. Do enough of that – and enough is a lot – and you begin preparing yourself for future pressure situations. Higher-handicap golfers have a slightly different problem. Because hitting

Five Nonphysical Building Blocks: Touch Feel Attitude Routine and Ritual 117 with the hands is the natural way to putt most golfers begin by doing just that. The results won’t be very good but because the golfer is still new to the game poor putting will seem acceptable. It’s later as these golfers improve their ball-striking and short games and work on bringing their handicaps down that their natural (hand-muscle-controlled) putting stroke limits their ability to score.

The Amateurs Proved It

Let me give you one more problem with “hitting” your putts: It’s an inaccurate way to control the power transmitted to the ball. We measured this (Figure 5.3.2) when we tested the putting strokes of some 150 amateurs at the DuPont World Amateur tournament by measuring the length of their strokes when they putted. The averaged results show (Figure 5.3.3) that the length of their backswings varied only about 6 inches while the length of the putts produced varied from 6 to 30 feet (on a flat putting surface of 9.0 green speed). This means their backswing the power generator of the pulling stroke varied only 6 inches for 24 feet or about one-quarter inch per foot.

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Kedleston Park Golf Club

The right elbow should remain locked to your right side throughout the backswing. As you can see, the left arm is still locked as well.This step is included for many reasons. First, it helps you swing around your spine and promotes a correct shoulder turn. It’s really hard to move your body horizontally, while keeping your right elbow locked to your side at the same time. Secondly, it prevents the “flying elbow.” The flying elbow produces everything from a slice to a wicked hook, depending on what you do with your hands in conjunction with it. So, keeping your elbow in contact with your side will help tremendously in assuring that you swing around your body, every single time. Third, it’s a power-producing move because it will put you in a position to easily flip your hands through the ball. Fourth, keeping your right elbow locked to your side will give you a great point of reference. It keeps your swing plane correct, and is a great indicator of when to stop the back swing. Finally, it helps you to “stay connected” throughout the swing. If you have your right elbow locked at your side, it will be hard to swing your arms without rotating your shoulders and visa versa.

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