Huntercombe Artisans Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Huntercombe Artisans Golf Club

About Huntercombe Artisans Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Huntercombe Artisans Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Huntercombe Artisans Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Huntercombe Artisans Golf Club

Members Club and one of the finest inland courses in the UK. It is long-established (built in 1901) and offers an unparalleled golfing experience – golf in the best traditions.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

Develop Your Artistic Senses (Feel Touch Green-Reading) 317 minimizes the kinesthetic side of feel and helps refine one’s mind’s-eye feel for putts. the cake” in putting. It also may be when you finally understand why you don’t want to supply putting power with your hands and wrists: This kind of power overwhelms the small kinesthetic messages of feel that are there and removes your chance of benefiting from that “icing.”

A way to heighten your feel for the physical (kinesthetic) sensations of putting is to make practice strokes with your eyes closed. Begin your usual routine keeping your eyes open for your first practice stroke looking at the hole and seeing the distance. Then close both eyes ending all visual input to your brain. Make a practice stroke and feel what you expect the results of that putt would be. 1)o this several times until you’re comfortable with the feel of your stroke then open your eyes step in perform your ritual and stroke your putt. Creating a preview stroke with your eyes closed is the opposite of putting with gloves on as it forces you to feel through your hands where the sensations are weak. It will also convince you that putting with “dead-hands” (no power supplied by hands) allows you to achieve maximum sensitivity and feel from your hands in the putting stroke.

Too-High Drill “Too High” is a game we use to help our students learn (1) what it feels like to play too much break and (2) how to float putts in from the high side when you want to be sure to avoid a three-putt. You can play Too High by yourself or in competition with any number of players. Find a hole on a pronounced slope and mark the ball-hole line through the center of the hole extending in both directions along the line you intend to putt from (Figure 13.3.5). You can putt from anywhere along or beyond this line with one rule: The ball that stops closest to the hole without going into the hole or below the line wins.

318 Develop Your Artistic Senses (Feel Touch Green-Reading) downhill slider I play nine feet of break trying to stop putts above the ball-hole li ne as close to the hole as possible.

Several winners arc shown in Figure 13.3.6 but any ball that falls in the hole while playing Too High cannot win. (If the ball falls in it wasn ‘t too high was it?) But holing out doesn’t necessarily mean you lose if all the other balls also roll in or below the line.

You’ll be surprised how difficult this game can be. On fast greens or severe slopes leaving putts above the hole can be a real challenge. But getting the feel for making haPPen what you want to happen will serve you well on the course. To

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

What happens when you practice putting? The heart doesn ‘t beat faster you are not excited and adrenaline isn ‘t produced. No adrenaline because no matter how hard you practice or how much you concentrate on the practice green by it’s very nature practice is repetitive and boring. Deep inside you know that the results don’t matter. You can pretend that this five-footer is to win The Masters but you can ‘t fool your subconscious. If you want to put a little pressure and excitement into your practice sessions either compete with a friend for more money than you can afford to lose or when practicing alone tell yourself (and then live by it) that you can’t quit until you achieve some specific goal such as holing 10 three-footers in a row. We call this “a closer ” and I highly recommend it. (More about it in Chapter 13.)

So if you can’t practice with pressure how do you make practice help your putting on the golf course when it really counts? You could try to avoid pressure on the course but that’s not going to happen. The only way to putt well under pressure is to develop a stroke in practice that works both in practice and on the course when the pressure is on and your muscles are strong. I ‘m not saying you should develop a “pressure stroke ” one that’s different from the stroke you normally practice and use. What I am saying is that you should be smart enough to use your practice time to develop a normal stroke that is the same as your pressure stroke. This is a stroke that doesn’t depend on the strength of your muscles or the speed of your heartbeat. It is a stroke that will work just as well under pressure as in practice. As you’ll see below it’s called a dead-hands stroke.

The Hit Stroke

Let me explain what this “dead-hands” stroke is not. It is not your natural stroke because most golfers’ natural instinct is to “hit” a putt with the muscles of the fingers hands and wrists. Our instincts are developed in our childhood when we play games that involve hitting things turning knobs and manipulating pushing and controlling the objects in our lives with our fingers hands and wrists. This also is the way most people putt because they consider it to be natural. But just because it’s natural does not make it either the right way or the best way.

But golfers hit their putts (Figure 5.3.1). And when a ball is hit the distance it rolls depends on how hard it is hit. The power of the putt depends on the energy or effort put into the stroke. And therein lies the problem: You can’t see or feel the power of a hit before it happens. No matter how much a golfer practices hitting putts the right distance and speed when he or she gets under pressure and tries to apply the same hit to the ball with adrenaline-filled muscles the results will be wrong. Once again as the muscles get stronger the same feel that produced good results in practice produces a more powerful hit under pressure.

Many low-handicap amateurs fall into this trap. They practice with the belief that the harder and longer they work the better they’ll putt under pressure. They believe that putting well under pressure involves courage strength of conviction or some other inner quality of the heart. I suppose these character traits are admirable but they have nothing to do with how far the ball rolls in good putting. If you insist on hitting your putts and controlling your putt distance with your muscles then the only way to practice feel and touch is under pressure. The good player can accomplish this by playing in tournaments in which he is likely to face many pressure putts. Do enough of that – and enough is a lot – and you begin preparing yourself for future pressure situations. Higher-handicap golfers have a slightly different problem. Because hitting

Five Nonphysical Building Blocks: Touch Feel Attitude Routine and Ritual 117 with the hands is the natural way to putt most golfers begin by doing just that. The results won’t be very good but because the golfer is still new to the game poor putting will seem acceptable. It’s later as these golfers improve their ball-striking and short games and work on bringing their handicaps down that their natural (hand-muscle-controlled) putting stroke limits their ability to score.

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Huntercombe Artisans Golf Club

Here is a picture at full speed. The wrists have completed their roll through the ball. The left elbow is close to the body, and about ready to break, allowing for follow through.Now, I’ll take you into the follow-through. This will be simple. Basically just keep turning around your spine. If you have flipped your wrists correctly, you won’t have to bother too much with the follow through. However, there is a basic position that you should be in when you finish the swing. You should be facing the target, and your right and left forearms should be crossed. Your right forearm should be closest to you, and the club should be out towards left field.

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