Hucknall Golf Centre

Golf Lessons at Hucknall Golf Centre

About Hucknall Golf Centre

Golf Lessons at Hucknall Golf Centre

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Hucknall Golf Centre for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Hucknall Golf Centre

Hucknall Golf Centre comprises an 18 Hole Golf Course, Practice Chipping and Putting Greens and Clubhouse Facilities. The 6001 yard, Par 71 Course has been carefully remodelled to provide a parkland feel. With mounding lining the majority of fairways it is important that you hit your drive on them in order to make your approach to the greens easier. Once on the greens they rank as some of the best in the County. Water has to be negotiated on a number of holes and avoid the resident swans at all costs.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

Step 4. Make at least three but not more than six practice swings until you see and feel the perfect stroke that you imagine would roll an imaginary ball sitting four inches to the left of your real ball (Figure 11.2.4) along an imaginary ball track over an imaginary hole to a resting point 17 inches behind and four inches

Establish Your Practice Framework 225 to the left of the real hole. (Everything about this practice – the imaginary ball ball track and 17-inches-past point – should be four inches to the left of where you see the real ball track and hole so when you move four inches over to address your putt everything will be correct for the real putt while still exactly the same as the way you just practiced it.)

Always make your first practice swing looking at the imaginary point 17 inches past sensing and feeling the proper-length swing for the distance. Make the second swing while looking down at your imaginary ball again trying to feel the perfect-size stroke. Make at least one more practice stroke while looking down then look up after you finish the follow-through (holding it for a few seconds) and imagine your imaginary ball rolling to the perfect 17-inches-past point. If after this third stroke everything feels right and you believe a repeat of your third stroke will hole the real putt commit to it as your “preview” of the best stroke you can make.

Step 5. With your decision that your last practice stroke was the perfect stroke the one that will hole the real putt you have created your preview stroke the perfect stroke for making your putt. You have just seen and felt it in your mind’s eye.

However if you are not completely confident after a third practice stroke in Step 4 you are allowed one two or even three more practice strokes until you see and feel the perfect preview stroke. Once you feel it commit to it and move into the address position for your real putt. Moving in is Step 5.

You’re now ready to execute your putting ritual and stroke your putt. Your 5step routine should have prepared you to make the best stroke you know how to make. The better you have seen and felt that your preview stroke was perfect and the clearer the perfect stroke remains in your mind’s eye the more likely you are to make a good stroke when you actually putt (Figure 11.2.5).

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

If you want an answer to question 2 – “How well do you putt?” – you must measure your percentage of putts holed from each distance. You can do this but it will take some effort. You have to record the distance of each putt on your scorecard as you move around the course and indicate those you hole. After 10 to 15

Problems on the Greens 29 rounds (and at least 5 to 10 putts from each distance) you’ll begin to be able to plot your own conversion chart and compare it to those of the pros.

As for question 3 – “How good can one get at putting?” – the answer depends on a number of things: the quality of the greens how well a player reads those greens and the quality of the player’s stroke and touch. Although none of these questions can be answered definitively in this book I assure you that all of the above are getting better all the time. As greens improve putting strokes improve and golfers learn to read greens better a higher percentage of putts from every distance will be made in the future.

Finally “Flow good will your putting be in the future?” That depends on your ability to learn the mechanics of a better putting stroke your ability to learn better putting feel and touch your ability to learn to read greens better and your ability to produce the right stroke at the right time. Depending on your lifestyle your determination and intensity your focus your self-discipline and practice habits and your ability to learn only you can provide this answer.

For most golfers to improve their scores it is often easier to reduce their number of three-putts than it is to increase their number of one-putts. This is generally true for golfers with handicaps greater than 20 although it is even true for some very fine lower-handicap players. As you can see in Figure 2.9.1 the length of the most frequent first putt on greens hit from outside 60 yards is 38 feet. (This distance varies a little with the handicap of the players measured but obviously there are many more long first putts than short ones.) This figure also shows that the most frequent first putt to follow shots hit from inside 60 yards is an 18-footer. If you combine these two curves and add in all the second and third putts that become necessary after the first putt is missed you can see a typical value for the number of putts of each length golfers face per round over a season of golf (Figure 2.9.2).

Now look at the conversion curve for this group of 15- to 25-handicap golfers (Figure 2.9.3) and the frequency with which they three-putt versus the putt distance (Figure 2.9.4). By comparing these data you can see the importance of making short putts as well as learning that you can save several strokes per round by eliminating three-putts from outside 30 feet. This means that you shouldn’t practice only short putts; the long ones are also important. And you must stop three-putting those long ones if you want to be a good putter.

For those not familiar with “lag putting ” some explanations:

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Hucknall Golf Centre

Now that you have the proper grip with your left hand, we can focus on the right hand. Wrap your right fingers lightly around the handle of the club as shown to the left.

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