Hounslow Heath Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Hounslow Heath Golf Club

About Hounslow Heath Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Hounslow Heath Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Hounslow Heath Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Hounslow Heath Golf Club

Located in Middlesex, Hounslow Heath Golf Centre (HHGC) offers an 18 hole / par 69 course measuring 5,901 yards with some of the most challenging and picturesque holes in the area. Along with the restaurant, Hounslow Heath also offers a golf shop, club hire and society days and has ample free parking. Whether you want to play, practice or learn golf, you will always be welcome at HHGC.No membership required HHGC is open to all on a pay-and-play basis, with excellent green fees on the 18-hole course.Golf clubs and trolleys are available for hire. A putting and chipping can also be used.

Hounslow Heath Golf Club

Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

4.2 Stroke Definitions

Where are you aiming? Sooner or later 1 ask that question of every golfer I work with. Aim is a critical aspect of putting (more on that later) and both you and I need to know not only where you are trying to aim (where you think you are aiming) but also where you are actually aiming your putter your stance and your stroke.

Technically when I refer to aim I am referring to a direction. The direction of your aim can be at a place like the edge of the hole or at an object such as a discolored piece of grass a spike mark or anything you can see and define. What you choose to aim at can be anywhere along your Aimline from just in front of the ball to alongside or even past the hole. Your aim can be one inch one ball three balls a foot or even 10 feet outside the right or left edge of the cup or it can be anywhere inside the cup. Only after you determine how much you expect your putt to break and define somewhere or something to aim at can the direction of your aim your Aimline be visualized located or marked on the green.

The track along which your putter travels is your “putter path. ” It can move straight back and straight through in-line with your Aimline it can cut across from outside-to-in or inside-to-out (shown in Figure 4.2.1) or it can loop around your Aimline. Golfers take their putters severely or slightly inside and outside their Aimlines waver along their Aimlines and sometimes incorporate a bit of all of the above into their putting paths. I believe there are almost as many distinct putter paths as there are golfers and I’m sure I haven’t seen them all.

Face Angle

A very important consideration is the putterface angle which we define as the angle between the perpendicular to your putterface and your Aimline (left side

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

Rotation isn’t the only lower-body motion to avoid. Some golfers sway back and forth as they putt (Figure 4.10.19). They probably don’t know they’re doing it but the ball doesn’t care what you do or don’t know. One forward inch of sway during a stroke will move your ball about one foot on the green. And that ‘s a foot you probably did not plan on.

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 107

A different kind of move is the “peek ” in which the golfer both turns and looks up in the middle of his stroke in an attempt to see the result. Probably the most famous peek was at the 1970 British Open at St. Andrews when Doug Sanders (Figure 4.10.20) missed a 2½-foot putt to drop into a tie with Jack Nicklaus who then beat him in the playoff.

4.11 Putter Fitting

Proper putter fitting is not fundamentally a part of putting stroke mechanics but there’s no doubt that it can help you make better strokes. If the length or lie of a putter is wrong for you you’ll be forced to make compensations in order to putt at all well (Figure 4.11.1). And every characteristic of your putter that is poorly fit to your body size shape setup posture or alignment is one more card stacked against the odds of your executing a pure accurate smooth and noncompensating stroke.

The truth is that most golfers change their strokes to fit their putters when they should be changing their putters to fit their strokes (Figure 4.11.2). They don’t do much in the way of putter fitting in some cases because all they’ve been told about choosing a putter is to use one that they like the looks of. In other instances golfers use whatever putter has been given to them.

You should never change from your proper eye position stance or posture to accommodate a poorly fit putter.

Hounslow Heath Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Hounslow Heath Golf Club

Now, you should be standing up straight, with your chest out, and your shoulders back. Your arms should be out in front of you, your elbows locked, and your wrists level with the height of your waist, while holding the club parallel to the ground. Next, bend over AT THE HIPS until the club touches the ground. Move towards or away from the ball according to where the club touches the ground. After some practice, you will be able to judge the distance well enough so that you don’t have to move around to get into position. Keep your chest out and straight while bending over at the hips. It is impossible to overstate the importance of this. You should not be bending with the back at all to reach down to the ball; you should be bending AT THE HIPS. This is one of the most common mistakes made by amateur golfers. If you look at any professional golfer on television, they will ALWAYS have a straight back, and they will ALWAYS bend at the waist to get to the ball. You will feel like your “seat” is protruding backwards more than usual. That is what we want here. Also, it’s okay if the toe of your club is not flush with the ground. It’s should be that way, especially for the long irons.

Hounslow Heath Golf Club