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Golf Lessons at Horsley Lodge Golf Club

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Golf Lessons at Horsley Lodge Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Horsley Lodge Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Horsley Lodge Golf Club

Located in the foothills of the Peak yet close to Derby, Horsley Lodge is one of the finest Country Hotels in the Midlands. Individually decorated bedroom suites named after previous historical owners and Graded 4 star with a Silver Award from enjoyEngland.com. Horsley Lodge Golf Club, boasts an 18 hole course in 168 acres of wonderful Derbyshire countryside. Designed by former Walker Cup captain and World Champion, Peter McEvoy, it was the first USGA specification 18 hole course in The Midlands.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

I immediately measured and learned that the visible break of most putts is only about a third of the true break. A third! I finally understood why my students couldn’t see the true break even when I was beating on them to look for it. It’s hard to sec something that never appears before you (the true-break Aimline) especially when something that looks so real (your ball rolling on the visible-break ball track) is right in front of you. So the eyesight of the 1 500 golfers I tested was not so bad after all. The amateurs had seen most of the visible break and the Tour pros had seen all of it. The problem was they thought the visible-break apex was where they had aimed and stroked their putts. They were totally unaware of their subconscious compensations to pull or push their starting lines up near the true-break Aimline in order to get their putts to roll there!

7.8 Gut-Feel Putting

You now should understand why most golfers under-read break. The only break they ever sec is the visible break and they assume the visible-break apex is the line they started their putt on. They never realize that their subconscious is fight ing compensating to get their putts high enough to have a chance to find the hole

(although it doesn’t quite make it all the way so 90 percent of their misses are below the hole).

When I ask golfers how they read the break of their putts what they are looking at or how they do this they often can’t answer. Those who do sometimes say they pick the spot they want the ball to roll over then aim at it. Many of them tell me they just feel the break in their “gut ” and putt “out there” somewhere. If you think about these answers and compare them to the situation detailed above you can understand why golfers miss most of their putts below the hole: Your putt needs to start on a line aimed at the true-break point to roll over the visual-break apex; but you don’t have a chance of rolling over the visual-break apex if you start your putt rolling at it because gravity will pull it down the hill every time.

If you just”trust it “”go with your instinct “”go with your gut “”trust your first read ” or “listen to your caddy ” you are a “gut-feel” putter. You’re probably trying to aim at the visible-break apex thinking it’s the true break and probably missing about 90 percent of your breaking putts below the hole. Most golfers are “gut-feel” putters. It’s the easiest way to putt because it ‘s comfortable (it’s the way you first learned) and your subconscious keeps you from being embarrassed. Unfortunately it’s not the best way to make putts. But that’s the way it’s been for over 400 years and it’s likely to continue that way for another 400 if you don’t start playing more break.

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

I can’t remember the name of the man who figured this out but I give him credit: He found something that really does work. He started every putt by standing directly behind the ball and pointed from his ball to a spot out in front of it on his intended starting line. Then he addressed the ball and again pointed down the line to make sure he was aligned correctly. Finally he stroked the ball and held his finish pointing at the same spot again exactly down the putt starting line.

This technique produced the consistently best putting I’ve ever seen and it is legal. But I’m certain that if someone switches to this style and starts winning with it the USGA probably will ban it.

One of the tenets of the USGA the ruling body of golf is to protect and maintain the integrity of the game in part by preserving its challenge and difficulty. I support this noble purpose and think most golfers feel the same way. If we lost the challenge in the game it wouldn’t be nearly so much fun. Having said that we all want to make our own putting strokes simpler so we can hole more putts score better and enjoy the game to its fullest.

In keeping with their tradition of maintaining the game’s challenge the USGA would prefer that golfers putt in what they describe as the “traditional style.” While this technique is not as simple or easy as the methods described above it’s not necessarily all that difficult either. Lots of putts have been and will be made the USGA way.

Up to this point I have been going from the easiest to more difficult ways to putt. Now I have to reverse that. In discussing the following ways to putt all of which conform to the Rules I will begin with the most difficult and work down to what I perceive to be the easiest way to putt.

The USGA would be happiest if every golfer would putt like Bobby Jones (Figure 3.4.1) used to putt and would use a putter similar to Jones’s old “Calamity Jane.” Jones putted standing perpendicular to the intended putting line and made what appeared to be a miniature golf swing. While this sounds like it might make putting easy being like all the other swings in golf in reality it makes putting quite a bit more difficult.

If the putting stroke is a miniature chip shot which is a miniature 5-iron swing which is a miniature driver swing it makes down-the-line vision difficult involves a slight rotation of the body and encourages rotation of the forearms. This also encourages rotation of the putterface provides far more power than is needed and brings to bear critical timing requirements all of which make putting so difficult and traumatic to so many golfers.

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Horsley Lodge Golf Club

Notice that the right elbow becomes locked now as the right arm continues to swing. As you can see the right wrist has started to roll on top of the left wrist. The left elbow is now closer to the body, and is able to bend. The left elbow cannot be completely stopped at the imaginary line, but just a hesitation is enough to let your hands swing through the ball. Notice that the triangle is still present.

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