Honiton Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Honiton Golf Club

About Honiton Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Honiton Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Honiton Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Honiton Golf Club

Honiton Golf Club is a lovely course set high in the hills to the east of Honiton town with splendid views across to the Blackdowns. Established in 1896 the greens are maintained in excellent condition as are the fairways. The fourth tee is the first technical challenge with a number of others starting out tight.Although in the hills the course itself is relatively flat to play, but it does boast beautiful views in all directions, and benefits include smart clubhouse facilities with a friendly atmosphere.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

I refer to all of this as your framework for practice because it reminds me of the frame of a house in which I want you to perform your practice drills and games. It is the house of feedback the house of successful practice and the house of “what works later on the golf course under pressure.” I hope you see my point which is that no matter how long or how hard you practice to polish and refine the building blocks of your putting game if you don’t improve from that practice or if what you learn doesn’t fit into your putting game without messing up something else then you have wasted your practice time and done little more than prepare yourself for frustration.

Your framework includes everything that precedes and accompanies your practice sessions (correctly setting Aimlines using a metronome getting the right putter fit holding your finish etc.). You have to get all the ingredients right or else you won’t improve. This may be more than you used to think of as practice but I’m telling you it’s the only way to succeed.

Establish Your Practice Framework 221

If you’re going to spend the time and effort to practice then do it right. Many people – including students in my schools – seem to think they don’t have time to practice properly so they rush through it trying to “just get it done. ” But then they find they have to make time to do it over again later because it has to be done right. Save yourself the time and trouble and do it right from the start. You’ll definitely see an improvement in your putting game.

Establish your ground rules for practice and adhere to them. Promise yourself that you’ll always practice with the intent to improve and with the feedback necessary to provide that improvement however small. The key to adhering to such a commitment is to realize that you don’t have to improve much each time you practice to become very good over the long haul. In fact you shouldn’t expect improvement to come quickly or in big leaps. Golf doesn’t work that way. At best you can expect to move a small (usually imperceptible) amount forward every time you practice. As a measure of success be satisfied by seeing improved scores over time.

It’s important to understand that practice makes permanent. So poor practice will only help you become a permanently poor golfer (and if you practice poorly you deserve it). Only perfect practice helps move you toward perfection. My putting practice guidelines are listed in Figure 11.1.1. 1 hope that they will help you set yours.

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

Therefore it is clearer to refer to this direction as your hall-hole line. Also realize that the ball-hole line extends forever in both directions (as shown) and that it is the ball-hole line that most golfers walk to and stand on behind their ball as they first try to read the break of their putts.

Standing behind the ball trying to read the green most golfers decide how much they think the putt is going to break and then where they are going to aim. They select a point or a direction where they intend to start their putt and we refer to the line from the ball to that point or direction as the “Aimline ” or desired initial starting line of the putt (Figure 4.1.3). It’s best called the Aimline because it is the line along which you align your body feet and (it’s hoped) your stroke because you want to start the ball rolling along that line. It ‘s where you’re aiming. If everything was figured properly the ball starts on your Aimline and will roll the proper speed and break (because of the slope of the green) gently into the cup.

The entire path that your putt takes is the “ball track” (left side of Figure 4.1.4). It may remind you of the “action track” sometimes used on television to show how a ball has traveled. The distances between the balls on the track indicate how fast (relatively) the putt is traveling: Farther apart means it is rolling faster; closer together and it is rolling slower. A detailed ball track provides an accurate understanding of a putt’s entire motion – both where and how fast it was going – better even than the same putt recorded and played back on videotape.

The amount or size of the “break” played on a putt is a measure of the difference between the direction you aim and start the putt rolling and where you want it to go. We define the amount of break as the distance between the Aimline (up by the hole) and the nearest edge of the hole measured along a line between the two (right side of Figure 4.1.4). The actual amount the ball breaks (curves) is something different because the ball track ideally curves into the center of the hole. But golfers refuse to deal with that detail. When golfers say they are playing one inch of break what they mean is that their Aimline passes one inch outside the edge of the hole as shown in Figure 4.1.5. Technically they expect the putt to break 3¼ inches – one inch plus half the diameter of the hole (2½ inches) – but they insist on thinking and saying that they are playing one inch of break.

Golfers the world over have made a tacit agreement to think of break as measured from the edge of the hole rather than the center. Unless the putt breaks less than half the width of the hole. Then we refer to it as breaking from somewhere inside the cup such as an “inside left edge” or “right center ” to the center of the hole. Only then do we acknowledge that our target is the center of the hole.

Let’s be sure that you understand the terms I’ve defined so far. You’ve cleaned your ball on the green and replaced it in front of your mark. Standing behind your ball on the ball-hole line you realize that if you putt directly along that line it will break to the left and miss below the hole. So you move slightly downhill from the

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 57 ball-hole line and try to imagine how far uphill to the right you must start your putt if you want to make it. You select an Aimline which runs about 28 inches outside the right edge of the hole you walk to the ball set up perfectly along your new Aimline and make practice strokes until ready. You execute the perfect stroke and your ball starts exactly on your Aimline. You guessed the right amount of break (28 inches) and gave your putt the perfect speed so as it rolls it breaks gently to the left and into the center of the cup. Your ball track formed the perfect arc (Figure 4.1.6) the ball entered the exact center of the hole (centered relative to the ball track) and all is right with the world.

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Honiton Golf Club

Notice that the left elbow is still locked at this point. The elbow is just crossing the imaginary line that you have created between your eyes and your belly button. Remember, try to stop your elbow at this point. This is the point where your wrists will start to flip through the ball.Also notice the angle between the left arm and the club shaft is almost the same as it was at setup.

Honiton Golf Club