Hinckley Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Hinckley Golf Club

About Hinckley Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Hinckley Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Hinckley Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Hinckley Golf Club

Our Course is situated in a rural location, to the South of Leicester, overlooking some of the most attractive countryside in the county. Golf was first played at Hinckley in 1894 on Burbage Common.Hinckley Golf Course meanders around Burbage Woods, and offers many interesting features – with water coming into play on several holes. The course has established a good reputation around the Midlands as a fine test of golf, and is regularly used for County events. It has also twice been the venue for the Midland PGA Match Play Championship.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

There will always be a theoretical line called your Aimline (aiming at the true break point) on which you want to start your putts. But as soon as you do gravity will pull them off that line and down the slope. No balls will ever roll up to or even near the true break point. The only way a putt ever continues to roll in its initial-starting-line direction is if the green is dead flat and the putt rolls dead straight. No breaking putts stay on their initial Aimlines (starting lines) long enough for golfers to see those lines. Even when their subconscious (by pulling or pushing) starts putts on the correct line (true-break-point Aimline) golfers never see them there. Golfers assume they start their putts on the lines they think they aimed at (where they see them) which we call the “visible-break ball track” (Figure 7.7.3). And because no balls ever roll along the true break Aimline and there is nothing to show us its location true break is for all intents and purposes invisible to golfers. With nothing to mark it we don’t sec it. It ‘s invisible.

I Never Realized This Myself

I’ d done all the research. I’d known for years that golfers were under-reading the true break in putts. I’d been pleading begging my students to look at their putts and watch how much they broke to learn they needed to play three times as much break as they used to think they were playing. I promised that if they did they could stop their subconscious compensations and they would make more putts. But I’d been asking them the whole time to putt along a line they had no chance to see because it is invisible to them.

It was a day in the fall of 1999. As I watched putts roll over and over through our hole bridge which marks the hole for putts without affecting their roll as shown in Figure 7.7.4 (on left) on a perfect ball track I realized that no ball ever

Green-Reading the 15th Building Block 157 came close to the true break point. At that moment I saw (in my mind’s eye) the true break and the visible break for the first time at the same time. When I saw both breaks simultaneously I was almost paralyzed. I realized that I ‘d never truly understood how balls curve as they break along their tracks. I had always imagined that they moved rapidly after first being struck rolling along the line they started on for a good distance up to their apex before curving quickly down to the cup as they lost speed toward the end of the roll (Figure 7.7.4 right). But that is clearly not the case. In fact if you look again at the real ball track on this 9-foot putt and compare it to my previously imagined ball path you can see how bad my imagination had been. Can you see why I (and perhaps you) thought these putts broke less? If you are an apex putter (you imagine and aim at an apex) and you look up and see the ball at what you assume is its apex (but is really only its visible break) rolling down into the hole the next time you see a putt on a slope like this you’ll under-read it for sure.

I immediately measured and learned that the visible break of most putts is only about a third of the true break. A third! I finally understood why my students couldn’t see the true break even when I was beating on them to look for it. It’s hard to sec something that never appears before you (the true-break Aimline) especially when something that looks so real (your ball rolling on the visible-break ball track) is right in front of you. So the eyesight of the 1 500 golfers I tested was not so bad after all. The amateurs had seen most of the visible break and the Tour pros had seen all of it. The problem was they thought the visible-break apex was where they had aimed and stroked their putts. They were totally unaware of their subconscious compensations to pull or push their starting lines up near the true-break Aimline in order to get their putts to roll there!

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

Starting your putts on your chosen initial line is primarily a function of your stroke mechanics specifically aiming your putter properly and striking it with a good path and square face angle. That’s the easy part. Imparting the proper initial speed is significantly more difficult because it involves stroke mechanics (making solid contact on the sweetspot) as well as putting “feel” and “touch” for distance plus your ability to read greens.

Taking a Trip

Stick with me here as I equate the skills of putting touch feel and green-reading on the golf course to what you do when taking a Thanksgiving drive to your parents’ house. First to have a nice trip you need to know how many miles you have to drive and how much of the trip is mountain driving. With that knowledge you can figure out how much gas you need to make it there. This is like having touch in putting which is knowing how long the putt is so you can then figure out how much power will be required in your stroke to get the ball to the hole.

And you’d better know how much gas you need before starting the trip because there are no filling stations (putting stroke adjustments) along the way (after you hit the ball).

Five Nonphysical Building Blocks: Touch Feel Attitude Routine and Ritual 113

Once you know how much gas you need then you have to figure out how hard to step on the gas pedal and when to step on the brakes as you drive on your Thanksgiving trip (something you figure out after you are into the trip) to negotiate the stops and turns in the road along the way. This “knowing how to drive” is analogous to knowing how to feel the proper stroke in putting where you must know in your mind’s eye the required size of the swing (or hardness of the hit) as well as how it will look and feel to impart the power which will provide the proper energy and speed of roll required. So touch is knowing how long the trip is and how much power it will require and feel is knowing how to apply the power (how to drive) to get you there.

Of course good touch and feel also require a proper read of the green knowing what will happen to your putt as it rolls. Think of green-reading as having a good road map for your journey. A good map or good directions can make the trip easy but a bad map with poor directions can turn the simplest trip into a nightmare.

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Hinckley Golf Club

Now that you have the proper grip with your left hand, we can focus on the right hand. Take your right hand and place it underneath the handle of the club. Lift up your left forefinger from underneath the club so it can move freely. Interlock your right picky with your left forefinger.

Hinckley Golf Club