Hill Barn Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Hill Barn Golf Club

About Hill Barn Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Hill Barn Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Hill Barn Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Hill Barn Golf Club

Welcome to Worthing’s Hill Barn Golf Club. On this website where you’ll find all you need to know about golf club membership, pay and play and society golf on our beautiful 18 hole golf course situated near Worthing on the South Downs.Designed by the legendary Fred Hawtree, Hill Barn Golf Club, Worthing, has a long and enviable history. Since 1936, the course’s rolling fairways have hosted many professional tournaments; been graced by names such as Peter Alliss and Tony Jacklin; and have provided the perfect challenge to all golfers from juniors to scratch players. Hill Barn Golf Club nestles in the rolling hills of the Southdowns providing sweeping views of the town of Worthing and of the English Channel to the south.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

6.4 Rhythm Has Benefits

Imagine that your putting stroke always moved at the same rhythm out of habit so you never had to think of it. Now the relationship of feel and touch to distance becomes simple. If your stroke always takes the same amount of time the only way to cover longer stroke lengths in that time would be to move your putter faster. Therefore longer swing lengths produce faster motions which roll putts farther. In other words the longer you swing your putter the longer your putts roll. There is never any thought of how “hard” to hit your putts or how “easy” to roll them. The only judgment required during your practice and preview swings is to judge the length of your stroke as it compares to the length of your putt.

Look at my two putting strokes in Figure 6.4.1. If you imagine the actual motion of these strokes can’t you just see each stroke rolling the ball distinctly different distances? I assure you both strokes took exactly the same amount of time. That time is based on my rhythm and if you measured it – from the top of my backswing to the end of my follow-through – you would find it swings at a

Stability and Rhythm: Two Artistic Fundamentals 137 cadence of 80 beats per minute or three-quarters of a second per through-stroke.

The results of this system – vertical-pendulum stroke mechanics swinging in a pendulum rhythm – are staggering in the simplicity they bring to putting. They reduce the complexity of calculations to judge the feel and touch for distance and completely eliminate the need to guess how hard or fast a stroke is necessary to roll your putt the perfect speed. They eliminate the forces required to keep the putter blade square to the Aimline. And perhaps best of all they eliminate the need for golfers to think about their strokes about what they should and shouldn’t be doing. Learning the mechanics of a vertical-pendulum motion then learning to use that motion at a rhythm compatible with your body eliminates most of the variables that screw up most golfers’ strokes.

Before finding your rhythm a proviso. Having that rhythm won ‘t do you much good if you don’t first develop a putting ritual (see section 5.10) because the two must work together: The ritual is performed at the cadence of your body rhythm so the ritual is a warm-up for the stroke rhythm. Your ritual is put to a count (based on the rhythm) and practiced often enough that you can perform it even when the pressure is on. So if you can remember how to count you can putt no matter what the circumstances.

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

One putting method you rarely hear about is “body putting.” As shown in Figure 3.5.1 the arms wrists and hands arc locked onto the body so the putter is swung by the rotation of the body around the spine. One reason it’s rarely mentioned is that you’ve never seen a Tour professional putt this way for any length of time and with any measure of success. I have tried it and yes putts can be made with this stroke. But that doesn’t mean you should do it.

Body putting does help eliminate the wrist collapse and forearm rotation problems so many golfers suffer from. However the body turn is so powerful it doesn’t allow golfers to develop the delicate touch for dealing with fast greens. Body putting also relies on the very thing that most golfers want to avoid on the green and that is unwanted body motion. Watch golfers particularly amateurs and you’ll see them unknowingly make all manner of body movements when they putt particularly swaying back and forth which puts them out of sync with their stroke. Because it destroys timing body motion is one of the leading causes of inconsistency and havoc in traditional putting.

The Power Stroke

A number of very fine players putt with what I call the “power stroke ” by which I mean a stroke in which the power comes from the muscles of the hands wrists or forearms. Some power-strokers use their wrist muscles hinging their wrists the way Arnold Palmer did very successfully in the early part of his career (Figure 3.5.2). Another power-stroker Tiger Woods doesn’t break his wrists but supplies power with his arm muscles (Figure 3.5.3).

Both Arnold and Tiger like to force things to happen to control their putts and make them do what they want them to do. And we all know that they both have so much talent they perform this way very well. I think however they would both putt better if they used less hit and more stroke in their putting motions. (What do I mean? Have you ever seen Arnold or Tiger blow a short putt four feet past the hole? That’s what I mean.)

No matter what provides the power there are two big drawbacks to a power stroke. First is the likelihood of a “power surge ” which can be caused by adrenaline resulting from anxiety or excitement; this significantly degrades the touch of most players under pressure. Second is the uncertainty of controlling the wrist hinge if there is one when the muscles are tight under pressure. Either way consistency usually suffers.

Methods of Putting 43

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Hill Barn Golf Club

Now that you have the proper grip with your left hand, we can focus on the right hand. Wrap your right fingers lightly around the handle of the club as shown to the left.

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