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Golf Lessons at Hilden Park

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Golf Lessons at Hilden Park

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Hilden Park for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

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Our scenic golf course with USGA specification greens is designed to test the most experienced golfer whilst providing a stimulating yet gentle introduction for the novice. Set in an established woodland setting, with lots of water and an interesting selection of par 3’s and 4’s, our course demands accuracy.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

5.6 Two Types of Muscle Memory

If you ever learned how to ride a bicycle even if it was 30 years ago you will never forget the feeling of how to ride. You may be a little rusty and momentarily forget how to balance your body on the bike but in just a few moments you can ride away almost as if you’d never stopped. This is a good example of long-term muscle memory which is stored in your brain and never forgotten.

Everyone has a second kind of muscle memory called short term – thoughts and sensations that disappear from our bodies and minds at a rate of about 30 percent every eight seconds. Say someone pinches you on the arm: You feel the pinch and it hurts. But it hurts only for a little while the pain fades away and in almost no time the pain is gone and you feel better. The memory of how badly you hurt or what the hurt actually felt like fades quickly. In eight seconds about one third of the feeling is lost. In the next eight seconds another third of what is left goes and on and on until there is nothing left to feel. Most humans operate with this same eight-second clock so it is called the “time constant” of short-term memory. It is also a good measure of your loss of kinesthetic awareness involved in the feel of your golf swing or putting stroke.

Both long- and short-term muscle memories are important in putting. Once you learn and know the feeling of your perfect putting stroke it will reside in your long-term memory and never totally be forgotten. You may not be able to produce it at will immediately after a long layoff but with a little work you’ll do it and just as important you will recognize it. The memories of the good stroke will come flooding hack just the way they do when hopping on a bicycle after a long layoff. That’s the good news.

The bad news is that the short-term feel for your putting stroke motion is subject to the short-term time constant of eight seconds. When does this come into play? As you are learning and practicing putting touch and on the course as you make practice strokes in preparation for the real one.

The way you learn what size stroke is required for each length putt during practice is by trying several and seeing how they look. This is what practice swings are for. After each stroke – whether or not it was the right length to roll the ball the

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

But golfers hit their putts (Figure 5.3.1). And when a ball is hit the distance it rolls depends on how hard it is hit. The power of the putt depends on the energy or effort put into the stroke. And therein lies the problem: You can’t see or feel the power of a hit before it happens. No matter how much a golfer practices hitting putts the right distance and speed when he or she gets under pressure and tries to apply the same hit to the ball with adrenaline-filled muscles the results will be wrong. Once again as the muscles get stronger the same feel that produced good results in practice produces a more powerful hit under pressure.

Many low-handicap amateurs fall into this trap. They practice with the belief that the harder and longer they work the better they’ll putt under pressure. They believe that putting well under pressure involves courage strength of conviction or some other inner quality of the heart. I suppose these character traits are admirable but they have nothing to do with how far the ball rolls in good putting. If you insist on hitting your putts and controlling your putt distance with your muscles then the only way to practice feel and touch is under pressure. The good player can accomplish this by playing in tournaments in which he is likely to face many pressure putts. Do enough of that – and enough is a lot – and you begin preparing yourself for future pressure situations. Higher-handicap golfers have a slightly different problem. Because hitting

Five Nonphysical Building Blocks: Touch Feel Attitude Routine and Ritual 117 with the hands is the natural way to putt most golfers begin by doing just that. The results won’t be very good but because the golfer is still new to the game poor putting will seem acceptable. It’s later as these golfers improve their ball-striking and short games and work on bringing their handicaps down that their natural (hand-muscle-controlled) putting stroke limits their ability to score.

The Amateurs Proved It

Let me give you one more problem with “hitting” your putts: It’s an inaccurate way to control the power transmitted to the ball. We measured this (Figure 5.3.2) when we tested the putting strokes of some 150 amateurs at the DuPont World Amateur tournament by measuring the length of their strokes when they putted. The averaged results show (Figure 5.3.3) that the length of their backswings varied only about 6 inches while the length of the putts produced varied from 6 to 30 feet (on a flat putting surface of 9.0 green speed). This means their backswing the power generator of the pulling stroke varied only 6 inches for 24 feet or about one-quarter inch per foot.

Think of the pressure that puts on every pull. These amateurs must be able to sense and feel a difference of less than one inch – between a 9- and 9 3/4-inch backswing – to produce putts of 12 and 15 feet respectively. And that’s not all. They also have to accurately feel the differences in the strength of the hits that produce these two putts of different lengths. As these examples prove there is not much margin for error when you’re trying to control the distance your putts roll with a hit. There is a better way.

5.4 The Dead-Hands Stroke

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Hilden Park

First of all, it’s important that you realize that your grip will affect the results that you get. However, it’s not as complicated as the other systems make it out to be. First, grab the club with your right hand so the face of it is toward the target. Keep the face pointed toward the target, while placing your left hand on the bottom of the grip or handle. At this point you should be holding your left hand out flat, so that it is touching the bottom of the grip. Position the joint where your left pinky meets your palm directly underneath the handle of the club. Keep the pinky there and place the first joint in your left forefinger directly underneath the club. Now, do not lift your fingers up, bringing the grip of the club into your palm; instead, hold the handle steady with your left fingers and wrap your palm around the top of the grip. This is an important distinction. Again, don’t wrap the fingers towards the palm, but instead wrap your palm around the top of the club. Now, you should be able to easily place your left thumb directly on top of the club. This should form a V-shape where your left thumb and left forefinger meet. This V-shape should point directly to your right shoulder when it’s complete.

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