Heysham Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Heysham Golf Club

About Heysham Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Heysham Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Heysham Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Heysham Golf Club

Our course is situated at the extreme west of the Morecambe/Heysham boundary and covers an area of 130 acres. Although only a matter of yards from the sea the course is not a links but a very fertile grassland made extremely difficult when the prevailing south-westerly wind blows.We also have a six-bay, covered driving-range.We have an active membership with both men’s and ladies’ teams in the many local competitions. We have lots of club competions – men’s, ladies, junior and mixed.

Heysham Golf Club

Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

But speed? Well that ‘s different. Every putt is a new experience. You ‘ve never putted this exact putt under these conditions at your present age at this exact moment before. You’ve never faced exactly this break on exactly this green at this green speed at precisely this distance from the hole. And because everything is new controlling the speed of your puns will always require every bit of your focus and attention. In fact ball tracks (which include your Aimlines and speeds) are just about the only thing you should think about when putting.

At the beginning of this chapter 1 said that speed is important enough to be the number-one principle in putting. Now you know why. It is the one element that you should think about with intense full-bore flat-out focus in the form of ball tracks every time you putt.

Wind Lopsided Balls Dimples Rain Sleet and Snow

9.1 Are You a Real Golfer?

I’m not asking how well you score or anything about your handicap. What I want to know is how much do you enjoy playing the game? For example when I lived in Abilene Texas about 15 years ago l played with a group of friends all of whom could be characterized as real golfers. We had a regularly scheduled game that went on come rain wind sleet or snow. The only time we didn’t play was when the wind conditions of the day failed the “chain test ” (Figure 9.1.1): If the wind wasn’t holding the chain horizontal to the ground we played. We are real golfers who love to play the game.

So let me ask you again. Are you a real golfer? If not you may want to skip this chapter because it may tell you more than you want to know about putting. I’m going to discuss how the wind your golf ball’s balance and even its dimples can affect your putting.

Heysham Golf Club

The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

When your face angle is pointing left of your Aimline it is closed (again for right-handed golfers). The “open” and “closed” terminology reverses for lefthanders. You must understand and remember that your putterface angle and putter path arc completely independent of each other.

Impact Point

Your impact point refers to the center of the contact area between your ball and putter on the putterface (Figure 4.2.3). For each and every putt there is one unique impact point which sometimes centers on a single dimple but more often several dimples plus an edge of one or more dimples. After many putts your many impact points will form your impact pattern (Figure 4.2.4) which is very important to the success of your putting. Aim path face angle and impact pattern are four of the 15 building blocks fundamental to your putting stroke mechanics. They describe and define how you move your putterhead and how your putterhead moves through the impact zone determines how well you roll your ball relative to your Aimline.

4.3 Defining Speed

Putt Speed

The velocity with which a ball moves along the green can be referred to in several ways. Some golfers refer to this as the rolling speed or speed of the putt. Some golfers talk about the pace of a putt while others talk about how fast a putt is moving. It would be nice if we all could mean and understand the same thing when referring to speed.

Technically the speed of a putt can be described and measured in quantitative terms as the velocity of motion (in units of inches or feet per second) in a given direction and the decay or decrease of velocity (the velocity profile) as the ball rolls to a stop. However since most golfers don’t think in technical terms on or off the course the actual velocity of a putt at any instant is neither very meaningful nor useful. As a result golfers talk about the speed of their putts as being too fast too slow or just about right as they approach the hole.

Heysham Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Heysham Golf Club

Hold the club steady with your right hand, and place left hand underneath the club as shown. The first joint of the left forefinger should be directly on the bottom of the handle, as well as the last joint of your left pinky. Once you have placed your palm on top of the club, do the same with your left thumb. Place it directly on top of the handle of the club. Next, interlock the left forefinger, and the right pinky. Nudge your right hand all the way towards the bottom of the grip. Now again, wrap the right palm all the way around the top of the grip. Don’t hold the grip of the club in your right palm. You should be able to cover up your left thumb with your right palm if you’ve done it correctly. You’ll see another V-shape being made where your right thumb and right forefinger meet. As a check, this V should be pointing directly at your right shoulder. If it doesn’t point at your right shoulder, rotate your hand on the grip so that it does. Your fingers should be giving the club most of the support it needs, NOT your palms.

Heysham Golf Club