Hemsted Forest Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Hemsted Forest Golf Club

About Hemsted Forest Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Hemsted Forest Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Hemsted Forest Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Hemsted Forest Golf Club

Hemsted Forest Golf Club is situated in the heart of Kent just a 20-minute drive from Ashford, Maidstone and Tunbridge Wells.The Course lies in a beautiful natural setting and offers a haven of peace and tranquillity far removed from the hustle and bustle of everyday life. The clubhouse, a converted oast, is the only one of its kind and the superbly appointed interior and changing areas add to that unmistakable feeling of quality.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

There’s nothing good about “hitting” your putts. Using a hit is disastrous under pressure while trying to control distance with a hit stroke requires providing a different amount of force and a different rhythm to every putt totally eliminating consistency. There is no way a player can anticipate executing a different stroke on every putt on every green as well as an equally talented person can learn to execute the same stroke at the same rhythm changing only the length of the swing.

Look at the color photographs (see insert in the center) of some of the best putters in the world. From George Archer and Ben Crenshaw probably the two best ever to Brad Faxon Loren Roberts Lee Janzen Dave Stockton Bob Charles and Phil Mickelson each has a beautiful smooth flowing and – most important – rhythmic putting stroke. Each one has a rhythm that tends to be the same day after day week after week year in and year out for all of their putts. if you think these guys are just lucky when they putt then you haven’ t watched them. They all have reasonably good mechanical stroke actions (although none are perfect) so their putters remain stable through impact. And they all have great rhythm. Even on their bad putting days they almost make most of their putts burning the edges of the cups. The reason for their consistency? Rhythm.

Rhythm is the glue of these great strokes but these guys don’t own the patent on rhythm. As you will see in section 11.3 anyone can improve his or her rhythm and I’ve never seen anyone who hasn’t putted better for it. Good setup alignment touch feel green-reading and stroke mechanics are all necessary for good putting. But without a constant and repeatable rhythm preferably one that is in sync with the natural cadence of your body you will never become a great putter. Never. And that’s a fact.

Green-Reading the 15th Building Block

7.1 Houston – We Have a Problem

When the world-famous phrase “Houston – We have a problem” was transmitted from the Apollo 13 spacecraft back to earth it signified one of the most profound understatements of all time. It came as a calm voice from a spacecraft on its way to the moon to the Houston ground-control command center from an astronaut who while petrified with fear understood that he had a real problem (there had been an explosion on board his spacecraft; Figure 7.1.1). However no one on Earth understood the magnitude of the problem. Ground control had lost all normal monitor and status signals and nothing they saw on their control-system panels made any sense. They were sure the crazy array of warning signals and lights out-of-tolerance levels and emergency-warning systems had to be some malfunction of their ground-control systems. The ground controllers thought “This can’t be real because for these readings to be correct the spacecraft would have to explode.”

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

5.2 Touch and Feel Are in the Mind’s Eye

The skill bases for your touch and feel (green-reading will be discussed in Chapter 7) are intermingled in your mind. They are also intermingled in that they have a combined effect on putting results. But each is a separate skill which can be learned and developed over time.

Touch is in your head but it begins with knowing what your putt looks like and remembering (knowing based on past experience) how much power (the size or intensity of stroke) was required in the past for similar putts. Touch is an acquired skill based on past experiences. It resides in your memory bank and plays a part in creating the mind’s-eye picture of the size of stroke you need.

Before you can develop a good feel for a putt you need to have a good idea for how long it is and how much power will be required to roll it the proper speed and distance: In other words you need to have touch. Given that feel for the putt involves having a good idea of how to apply the power which will be needed to roll the ball at the optimum speed along that line to allow it to break into the hole. Having good feel for a putt is having the idea or picture in your mind’s eye of how the stroke will look and feel in both rhythm and intensity as it rolls the ball to the hole. So a part of feel is in your head. Feel also involves a kinesthetic awareness for the violence (or nonviolence) of your swing and knowing the physical sensation to expect at impact including the vibrations that will travel up the shaft after the putter strikes the ball. It is based on the feel of your collected experience from thousands of swings you’ve made on previous putts and the results they produced. This feel is produced in your nerve endings fingers arms and shoulders in the muscles of all of these entities as well as in your brain and memory.

Is one part of feel more important than any other? I don’t know. But more to the point I’m not sure I care. Because I do know that all these factors are necessary for good putting and the end result feel ultimately is experiential. You’ve got to do it lots of times to learn it and know it.

Feel is knowing how to do it touch is knowing what to do. A golfer with good touch can have a had day physically when his body simply can ‘t execute what his brain knows he should do. On a day like this we’d say his feel is off. This golfer will be frustrated because he doesn’t seem to be able to do what he knows he can and needs to do. Compare that to a golfer with poor touch: He can have great feel and still never make a putt because if you choose the wrong speed yet roll it perfectly at that speed the results still won ‘t be very good. So poor-touch golfers are more likely to get bewildered than frustrated (Figure 5.2.1).

Five Nonphysical Building Blocks: Touch Feel Attitude Routine and Ritual 115

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Hemsted Forest Golf Club

Start your backswing. Focus on keeping your back straight, and your chest out. To help you swing directly around your spine, try focusing on rotating your right shoulder back and around your spine. If you focus on the right shoulder, your left shoulder will be in the correct position automatically. Simple. Keep your left elbow locked.

Hemsted Forest Golf Club