Hebden Bridge Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Hebden Bridge Golf Club

About Hebden Bridge Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Hebden Bridge Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Hebden Bridge Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Hebden Bridge Golf Club

Hebden Bridge Golf course is situated above the town of Hebden Bridge approximately 1000 feet above sea level. The course is laid out on a hill side making use of the natural contours of the land to produce a challenge for golfers of all levels. Although relatively short at just over 5200 yards, the combination of the terrain and the prevailing weather conditions (it’s almost always windy) ensure that you have to place your shots carefully in order to record a good score.

Hebden Bridge Golf Club

Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

However you choose to hold on to the putter your grip should present the putter-face to the ball in a square position through impact keep your forearm flow-lines in good position and allow you to feel the flow of your stroke.

There’s no doubt that the grip is important. But there is no one grip that is best for all golfers. The most common is the “parallel-palm” grip (Figure 11.6.9): Holding the grip along the lifeline of your left hand instead of in the fingers (as in the power grip used on full-swing shots) helps the putter function as part of your arm and decreases the tendency to supply power with your hands (Figure 11.6.10). Keeping the palms parallel to the face of the putter also makes it easy to keep your forearm flow-line in good position (parallel to your Aimline).

Something else which very few people talk about is spreading the hands apart on the grip. The farther apart they are the less active the wrist muscles in the stroke which explains some of the success of the long puller. But spreading the hands also makes it difficult to coordinate the actions of the arms so it is impractical on a standard-length putter (although you might try moving your hands apart a little bit just to see what happens). Unfortunately once you find a good

252 Establish Your Practice Framework grip I don’t know of any feedback devices that help you groove hand positions accurately other than using the flat surfaces of the putter grip itself.

There are many acceptable ways to hold a putter such as the “reverse-overlap ” “finger-down-the-shaft ” “split-grip ” “equal-hand ” “push-hand ” and “baseball” grips (Figure 1L6.11). But without seeing you putt I can only suggest that you test and evaluate a few grips as you work to improve your stroke mechanics. Sometimes changing a grip can affect the path and face angle of your putter through impact; more on that in the next chapter.

Unusual Grips

Hebden Bridge Golf Club

The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

This is a point worth repeating because most golfers don’t think enough about the speed of their putts. Rather they focus on line. If you are a “line” putter try putting with a pool cue or a True Roller and I promise you’ll learn to appreciate the importance of speed in making putts.

3.3 It Gets More Difficult

So we’ve disposed of two methods that no one can or should be allowed to use. What about some techniques that have been tried and in some cases are still in use?

Croquet-Style

Next on the “easiness” scale (which means it’s a little more difficult than the techniques above) is standing so you face the putting line and putt croquet-style between your legs. Yes this really has been used. Bob Duden and Bob Shave Jr. two PGA Tour pros who had been struggling with their putting used this technique back in the 1960s. I’ve never been sure whether the USGA banned this method because it was too easy too nontraditional or it just looked bad when viewed from behind. It certainly made putting easier because it gave the golfer the best view of the line before the putt and a clear view of what the ball was doing immediately after it started to roll.

Both of these views provide critically important feedback that golfers generally miss when putting in the conventional style (that is standing to the side of the line). Croquet-style putting has other benefits: It removes all rotational motion of the forearms (which opens and closes the putterface during conventional putting) it forces the wrists to remain solid (no breakdown) and it creates the perfect in-line stroke path straight down the intended putting line.

Croquet putting is so easy that it was used by no less a legend than Sam Snead in the mid-1960s (when he was in his mid-fifties) to counter a case of the yips. Snead actually putted this way (Figure 3.3.1) – with one foot on either side of the target line – during the 1966 PGA Championship where he finished tied for sixth. Perhaps it was seeing the great Samuel Jackson Snead putt from the wrong direction or perhaps it was deemed to reduce the skill required to play the game – in any case croquet-style putting was quickly outlawed by golf’s powers that be.

Hebden Bridge Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Hebden Bridge Golf Club

The follow through is now complete. The forearms are completely crossed, showing that you have gotten your hands through the ball. It may take a few days to get used to this new “left elbow close-to-side, forearms crossed-at-finish” concept. It will come though. It’s one of the best things you can do for your golf swing. No more blocking to the right or uncontrollably slicing the ball!

Hebden Bridge Golf Club