Heaton Moor Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Heaton Moor Golf Club

About Heaton Moor Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Heaton Moor Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Heaton Moor Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Heaton Moor Golf Club

Set in a mature and protected conservation area, the gently undulating parkland course has two separate 9 holes starting from the Clubhouse. As a member and if time is short, the layout lends itself to playing just a few holes, if preferred, since there are several starting points. On a light summer evening it is hard to resist slipping out for ‘a bit of practice’ and you always have the added comfort of knowing that you are never more than a short walk from the 19th! A small practice ground adjoins the main drive and there are practice putting greens by the Clubhouse and the first tee.

Heaton Moor Golf Club

Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

We can see – and therefore know about – the obvious imperfections on the surface of a putting green caused by disease spike marks and pitch marks. These often cause balls to go somewhere other than where we wanted them to go:

All of these green imperfections can have a negative effect on putting especially when the ball is moving slowly (as it does near the end of its roll). And you know what? There is nothing you can do about it. But all of these are seeable so golfers understand them and know they are part of the game. If you miss a putt because of one of them you mark it down to a bit of bad luck assume that your good luck will come and don’t worry. But most important you don’t change your stroke because of them.

What about some factors that golfers don’t see? There are many. The length of the grass on a green (determined by the mower that cut it that morning) has a tremendous effect on how fast balls roll and how much putts break that day. The moisture in the surface of the green influences green speed: A light covering of dew water from a recent rain or the irrigation system even the sand content near the surface of the green (which affects water retention) all can change a putt’s roll speed and break. Each of these factors can be measured and known by golfers (in fact I’ll discuss them in Chapter 7) but they rarely are.

What about grain the direction the grass grows (Figure 2.3.1)? The stronger the grass blades and the stronger the forces of nature (such as nearby water sun angle and wind all of which cause grass to grow in certain directions) the greater the likelihood that the grain will influence your putting. Again grain can be accurately measured and known but not in the time a golfer has while sizing up his next putt. (For a more detailed look at grain see section 7.10.)

Here’s one few golfers consider: the ball’s balance. Most golfers assume that all golf balls are perfectly balanced but I assure you they are not. In many balls the center of gravity (CG) or mass (the center of weight distribution) is not exactly at its geometric center. To understand this imagine a golf ball as shown in Figure 2.3.2 which is perfectly balanced except for a small mass of lead positioned horizontally from its center. Such an imbalance could he caused by a bad operation in the construction of (or mud on) a ball. Imagine if such a ball was rolled perfectly side by side with a perfectly balanced ball on a perfect green. Due to the imbalance of weight rather than rolling in the desired direction (Figure 2.3.3 right) the ball would roll off to the side (Figure 2.3.3 left) and miss the hole. Worse than the lost stroke the golfer probably would think he had just blown a short putt that he should have made leading him to change his stroke to fix a problem that didn’t exist. The problem which the golfer never knew of or even suspected was the ball (see sections 9.8 and 9.9).

Getting a little scared? Don’t be. True putting can appear to be very complex. And things at times will get still worse believe me. But believe this too: It’s no problem. Because in the end once you learn to not be bothered by all these “nitnoy” problems the more good strokes you make and the better you read the greens the more of your putts that will find the hole.

Heaton Moor Golf Club

The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

So Sam modified the method slightly changing to “sidesaddle” (Figure 3.3.2)

Methods of Putting 39 doing everything as much as he could the same except bringing both feet to the same side of the target line. Snead continued to putt this way until the end of his competitive career and his creation is I believe the next-easiest way to putt.

Just as with croquet-style Sam found that putting sidesaddle allowed him to bend over slightly and look down the line of his putt. But more important it still did away with the breakdown of his wrists. I’m sure golf’s grand pooh-bahs didn’t like what they saw but either they couldn’t figure out a way to outlaw the sidesaddle technique without getting sued or maybe they didn’t have the heart to drive Sam out of the game. Thank heavens they didn’t because it was wonderful watching him play the game even putting from the side for all those years.

Another Variation on a Theme

Someone else started with Snead’s sidesaddle style and made a modification of his own which produced the best putting I’ve seen to this day. Rather than using a standard-length (roughly 35-inch) putter a fellow came to me putting sidesaddle but with a longer-than-normal (about 42-inch) putter (Figure 3.3.3). He stood beside the putting line facing the hole and swung the putter along a perfect vertical pendulum with his top hand and the top of the putter tucked under his armpit. He leaned over to set his eyes directly over the putting line then balanced his weight by extending one foot away from the line.

I can’t remember the name of the man who figured this out but I give him credit: He found something that really does work. He started every putt by standing directly behind the ball and pointed from his ball to a spot out in front of it on his intended starting line. Then he addressed the ball and again pointed down the line to make sure he was aligned correctly. Finally he stroked the ball and held his finish pointing at the same spot again exactly down the putt starting line.

This technique produced the consistently best putting I’ve ever seen and it is legal. But I’m certain that if someone switches to this style and starts winning with it the USGA probably will ban it.

Heaton Moor Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Heaton Moor Golf Club

Keep focusing on bringing your right shoulder back and around your spine. Some of you may be able to turn about 90 degrees around your spine as shown in the picture on the left. Others may only be able to turn 45 degrees around your spine. Either is okay, but do not start moving other parts of the body to compensate for not being able to make a full shoulder turn. Stop when it gets uncomfortable. The important part is to STAY CONNECTED. When your left arm becomes parallel to the ground, stop your swing.

Heaton Moor Golf Club