Haydock Park Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Haydock Park Golf Club

About Haydock Park Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Haydock Park Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Haydock Park Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Haydock Park Golf Club

Founded in 1877, Haydock Park Golf Club is a well established golf course situated near Haydock Park Racecourse, it is a mature parkland course of just over 6,000 yards.It was designed by the famous golf course architect James Braid. You can find more information on James Braid by clicking here.Only 5 Minutes from Junction 23 on the M6 and just off the A580, it is easily accessible from any part of the country.

Haydock Park Golf Club

Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

This rule – the faster the roll the less the break (on any given slope) – holds whether the faster ball speed is caused by the golfer initially rolling the putt faster because the green is slow or rolling it faster on a fast green to minimize the break. And while that rule is true so is its opposite: The slower you roll a ball to the hole (as long as you still get it there) the more it will break.

The High Road Is Best

There is more than one possible Aimline (initial starting line) along which every breaking putt can be made. Roll the ball at different speeds and it will need different Aimlines to find the hole. For example roll the ball faster and it will take less break so the Aimline doesn’t need to allow for as much break; conversely roll the ball slower so it breaks more and the Aimline must feature a larger break allowance.

And so there are the extreme Aimlines. At one extreme is the “highest-possibletrue-break” Aimline. This works if the ball is rolled at its slowest possible speed with just enough pace for the ball to die (on its last hit of turn) downhill into the front edge of the cup (Figure 7.9.4 left).

Green-Reading the 15th Building Block 163

At the other extreme is the “lowest-possible-true-break” Aimline (Figure 7.9.4 right). This works with the highest possible speed the ball can roll and stay in the cup (when it hits the back of the hole dead center). Any putt started on a lower Aimline or rolled at a faster speed will miss on the low side of the cup or jump over bounce off the back edge or lip-out due to excessive speed.

Haydock Park Golf Club

The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 85 his perfect in-line-square stroke (Figure 4.7.9). The problem is obvious: If you don’t align your shoulders parallel to the desired starting line for the putt even the perfect stroke path and a square putter blade won’t start the ball rolling on the right line.

So if you are going to take my advice and develop an in-line-square stroke you must be absolutely sure that as you learn this stroke you also learn to address the ball with your shoulders square (parallel-left) to your putting line. And as you will learn in Chapter 11 setting up parallel-left has other benefits as well.

4.8 The Importance of Putterface Angle

While putter path has relatively minor influence on the starting line direction of your putts (only about 17 percent) the putterface angle at the moment of impact (Figure 4.8.1) has a tremendous effect the remaining 83 percent (assuming contact is made on the sweetspot). This means face angle is more than four times as important as putter path. You may find this imbalance in importance surprising (most golfers do) but it’s true.

If you are having a hard time believing this run the following test for yourself. As shown in Figure 4.8.2 aim the edge of a heavy piece of wood to the left edge of a target. Place a ball just outside the wood about the distance from the heel of the

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 87 putter to the sweetspot and hold the putterface open to a 45-degree angle to the target with a piece of cardboard (cut the cardboard with equal-length sides A and B at right angles then cut side C between the end points as shown in the inset). Using both hands to hold the face open at that angle and keeping the heel against the wood slide the putter toward the target to simulate a putting stroke (shown from right to left in figure). If you keep the face 45 degrees open the ball will start to the right almost perpendicular to the open face (actually 45 degrees times .83 = 37 degrees) no matter how hard you hit it.

This should convince you that even with the perfect path poor face angle at the moment of impact will start your putts off-line big-time.

Haydock Park Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Haydock Park Golf Club

The right elbow should remain locked to your right side throughout the backswing. As you can see, the left arm is still locked as well.This step is included for many reasons. First, it helps you swing around your spine and promotes a correct shoulder turn. It’s really hard to move your body horizontally, while keeping your right elbow locked to your side at the same time. Secondly, it prevents the “flying elbow.” The flying elbow produces everything from a slice to a wicked hook, depending on what you do with your hands in conjunction with it. So, keeping your elbow in contact with your side will help tremendously in assuring that you swing around your body, every single time. Third, it’s a power-producing move because it will put you in a position to easily flip your hands through the ball. Fourth, keeping your right elbow locked to your side will give you a great point of reference. It keeps your swing plane correct, and is a great indicator of when to stop the back swing. Finally, it helps you to “stay connected” throughout the swing. If you have your right elbow locked at your side, it will be hard to swing your arms without rotating your shoulders and visa versa.

Haydock Park Golf Club