Hartley Wintney Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Hartley Wintney Golf Club

About Hartley Wintney Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Hartley Wintney Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Hartley Wintney Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Hartley Wintney Golf Club

Hartley Wintney is a private members club that has been providing enjoyable golf for over 100 years.It is situated in the beautiful North Hampshire countryside where it provides the ideal location for a relaxing game of golf in tranquil surroundings with many mature trees and water hazards. The course is easily reached from the M3 and M4 and is close to the borders of Berkshire, Surrey and Hampshire.The atmosphere in the club encourages you to relax and enjoy your visit. The club aims to provide an environment where the whole family can enjoy themselves and provides something for everyone. The setting provides an ideal opportunity to recharge your batteries and to escape from the stresses of daily life.Hartley Wintney is an 18 hole, par 71 parkland and wooded course measuring 6240 yards. The layout has been carefully designed to provide a challenge for golfers of all standards.

Hartley Wintney Golf Club

Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 67

If you don ‘t learn to aim correctly then no one (myself and my Scoring Game Schools included) will ever be able to teach you a good putting stroke. A good putting stroke with bad aim will miss every time and your subconscious will never let you learn a stroke that it knows will miss every time. Instead you ‘ll begin compensating. However once you learn to aim accurately along the Aimline you choose your putting instincts will lead you to make better less compensating strokes and that leads to holing more putts.

4.5 Power Source

Your power source is the part of your body that supplies the power to control and move the putter through the impact zone of your stroke. The muscles you use to control your putter determine your putting power source. The three most common power sources used in putting are: (1) the small muscles of the fingers hands wrists and forearms; (2) the arms and shoulders; and (3) body motion.

Fingers Hands and Wrists

Most golfers control their putting with the small muscles of their hands wrists and forearms. These are the muscles that control most of the things we do in life – hitting things twisting things moving things – so using our hands and forearms in golf is instinctive and therefore feels natural to us. But instinct and natu

Hartley Wintney Golf Club

The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

Your power source is the part of your body that supplies the power to control and move the putter through the impact zone of your stroke. The muscles you use to control your putter determine your putting power source. The three most common power sources used in putting are: (1) the small muscles of the fingers hands wrists and forearms; (2) the arms and shoulders; and (3) body motion.

Fingers Hands and Wrists

Most golfers control their putting with the small muscles of their hands wrists and forearms. These are the muscles that control most of the things we do in life – hitting things twisting things moving things – so using our hands and forearms in golf is instinctive and therefore feels natural to us. But instinct and natu

68 The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics ralness don’ t necessarily mean correct. And in fact trying to find a way to putt that is both initially comfortable and natural usually leads to disaster.

Supplying the power which determines how fast and how far your putts will roll from the muscles of your wrists hands and fingers (Figure 4.5.1) is bad. Wrist motion (hinging) causes putterface angle variations and hand and wrist muscles lend to tighten up and not work well under even slight pressure. But powering your putts with these muscles also brings an added complication: It’s not had all the time.

You can practice putting this way for years and as long as you putt on the course exactly the way you do in practice – relaxed and calm – things will be reasonably okay. But wait until you get really excited. When your heart begins to beat faster because a putt really matters your body naturally produces adrenaline which makes all of your muscles stronger. Then all your practice goes out the window because the muscles that control your putting power are now stronger than they ever were on the putting green. Even if your stroke feels the way it did in practice the adrenaline-induced extra power will cause it to provide the wrong amount of energy to your putts and produce bad results on the course.

You Can’t Avoid Adrenaline Everybody gets to experience excitement and adrenaline in golf. It’s part of why we love the game and if you want to become a better player you must learn to deal with it. You must learn to play well when adrenaline is in your system. This is easy in the power game when you want to hit the ball as far you can with whatever club is in your hands. Adrenaline in your system helps you to do this. But putting is altogether different. You can’t take one less club on the green when you’re pumped up. And you certainly don ‘t want to putt the ball as far as you can.

Hartley Wintney Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Hartley Wintney Golf Club

The follow through is now complete. The forearms are completely crossed, showing that you have gotten your hands through the ball. It may take a few days to get used to this new “left elbow close-to-side, forearms crossed-at-finish” concept. It will come though. It’s one of the best things you can do for your golf swing. No more blocking to the right or uncontrollably slicing the ball!

Hartley Wintney Golf Club