Harrow School Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Harrow School Golf Club

About Harrow School Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Harrow School Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Harrow School Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Harrow School Golf Club

These clubs are independent of the School and are members-only. Other sports and school clubs hire the cricket nets, both indoor and outdoor, cricket pitches, the swimming pool, sports hall, the Olympic-standard athletics facilities and other playing fields regularly or on an ad hoc basis.

Harrow School Golf Club

Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

While putter path has relatively minor influence on the starting line direction of your putts (only about 17 percent) the putterface angle at the moment of impact (Figure 4.8.1) has a tremendous effect the remaining 83 percent (assuming contact is made on the sweetspot). This means face angle is more than four times as important as putter path. You may find this imbalance in importance surprising (most golfers do) but it’s true.

If you are having a hard time believing this run the following test for yourself. As shown in Figure 4.8.2 aim the edge of a heavy piece of wood to the left edge of a target. Place a ball just outside the wood about the distance from the heel of the

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 87 putter to the sweetspot and hold the putterface open to a 45-degree angle to the target with a piece of cardboard (cut the cardboard with equal-length sides A and B at right angles then cut side C between the end points as shown in the inset). Using both hands to hold the face open at that angle and keeping the heel against the wood slide the putter toward the target to simulate a putting stroke (shown from right to left in figure). If you keep the face 45 degrees open the ball will start to the right almost perpendicular to the open face (actually 45 degrees times .83 = 37 degrees) no matter how hard you hit it.

This should convince you that even with the perfect path poor face angle at the moment of impact will start your putts off-line big-time.

Do you still think putter path is as important as face angle? Reposition the piece of wood to produce a path at 45 degrees to the right of your Aimline and hold the putterface square to the Aimline aiming straight at the hole. Again use both hands to control face angle and path and slide the putterface along the edge of the wood. This stroke – with perfect face angle but 45-degree off-line path (Figure 4.8.3) – starts the ball only about 7 degrees off of the Aimline.

So if you are going to make a stroke error of 45 degrees which result would you rather see? A putt off-line by 7 degrees or 37 degrees? I’m sure you now agree with me that if you want to putt consistently along your intended Aimline you’d better learn to keep your putterface angle square to that line (the square face angle advantage of the pils vs. screen-door stroke should

Harrow School Golf Club

The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

Stimpmeter is a solid straight piece of aluminum extruded at a 30-degree angle with an indentation near the top and a beveled bottom (Figure 4.3.2). The beveled bottom allows the Stimpmeter to sit low to the green surface and reduce the bounce of a ball rolling down the channel when it hits the green.

The Stimpmeter was designed to release balls onto a green surface with constant initial speed (energy).

Measuring Green Speed To use a Stimpmeter a ball is placed in the indentation and the device is raised slowly until the ball rolls free and down the groove onto the green (Figure 4.3.3). Care must he taken to hold the Stimpmeter still as the ball rolls down the ramp to ensure constant release energy and ball speed at the bottom of the ramp.

To measure green speed three balls are rolled in one direction on the green measuring how far each ball rolls (in feet) from the end of the Stimpmeter. The same three balls then are rolled in the opposite direction over the same section of the green and again the distances are measured. The six distances are averaged to produce a quantitative measurement of the average distance a ball rolls on that green called the green speed. A slow green is about a 7 (meaning the balls rolled an average of 7 feet) while a fast green comes in at about a 10. Most PGA tournaments aim for green speeds between 10.5 and 11. When greens start rolling at 12 to 13 they are called “Augusta fast ” because that’s often the speed of the greens at Augusta National Golf Club home of The Masters every spring.

Longer rolls (from higher green speeds) for longer times mean the friction of

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 63 the green surface is low letting balls roll farther and longer. A rapidly slowing and short roll off a Stimpmeter means the friction of the green surface is high and the green speed is very slow.

Green speed always affects a putt’s speed and direction of roll (except on dead flat greens where direction is straight no matter what the speed). And the combination of green speed the amount of energy transferred to a putt and the influence of contours and slopes on the greens determines the results of your putts based on how much the putt truly breaks your putt’s initial Aimline and starting speed.

Harrow School Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Harrow School Golf Club

Notice that the left elbow is still locked at this point. The elbow is just crossing the imaginary line that you have created between your eyes and your belly button. Remember, try to stop your elbow at this point. This is the point where your wrists will start to flip through the ball.Also notice the angle between the left arm and the club shaft is almost the same as it was at setup.

Harrow School Golf Club