Harburn Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Harburn Golf Club

About Harburn Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Harburn Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Harburn Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Harburn Golf Club

Harburn Golf Club is a challenging 18-hole Parkland course with a good variety of Beech, Oak and Pine Trees. The club was founded in 1932 and offers a stiff challenge to golfers of all levels. If you are planning to play golf in West Lothian, Harburn is an absolute must to play. We are located near the village of West Calder, around 14 miles west of Edinburgh, a couple of miles south of the village on the B7008, is an ideal rural retreat, yet only a short distance from the M8 motorway.

Harburn Golf Club

Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

But your shoulders will move when you swing your arms in a proper pendulum motion and if your hands are vertically below your shoulders during this time your shoulders should move in a vertical plane. To see and feel this motion stand in the middle of a doorway with a long broom handle or something similar held across your shoulders (use two strong rubber bands to hold the rod against your shoulders as shown in Figure 12.5.11). Without aiming at a target hole swing your putterhead parallel to the wall. If you rotate your shoulders at all horizontally the broom handle will bang into the doorjamb and immediately stop the motion. Just a few minutes of feeling proper vertical rotation motion which does not touch the broomstick to the doorjamb and you will get the right idea.

CHAPTER 13

Develop Your Artistic Senses (Feel Touch Green-Reading)

13.1 Touch and Feel Are Different

I am frequently asked to explain the differences between touch and feel in golf. Many golfers use the two terms interchangeably without thinking about it (as I used to do). Now that I understand a little more about how much is going on in a golfer’s mind and body however I think we need separate terms to describe these distinct attributes. Very simply (and you can read Chapter 5 again for more details) I liken touch on the greens to knowing what to do and feel to knowing how to do it (as detailed in Figure 13.1.1).

With these distinctions it becomes possible to focus on and measure your touch and feel abilities and see if one or both needs improvement and work. I’ll discuss how to improve touch first and then feel (as well as how to improve your green-reading) later in this chapter.

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

I don’t mean to criticize Arnold or Deacon Palmer because Arnold putted well enough to be one of the best players of all time. But I’m convinced that with his fantastic imagination talent and competitive instincts (he certainly never had the best golf swing) he would have been even more dominant and for a longer time if he had used a simpler putting stroke and been a better putter.

The Grip: Light Is Better Than Tight

There are any number of ways to hold a putter. But I think there is only one way to set grip pressure and that is light and unchanging throughout your stroke. Light pressure is better than tight because squeezing your hands and flexing the hand wrist and arm muscles makes them stronger less pliant and less sensitive to delicate feelings. And remember your hands should be dead rather than strong when putting. So the lighter your grip (as long as the putter doesn’t slip out of your hands and your wrists don’t get floppy) the less likely you are to “hit” your putts and the more likely you will “stroke” them. This applies to all putting grips.

The purpose of your grip is to hold on to your putter as you allow it to move along the perfect in-line path with a square face angle through impact. There is no

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 105 right or wrong way to hold a putter for all golfers. But there is a best way for each golfer to hold his or her putter. This best way will lead to making the best stroke the greatest percentage of the time.

The grip that makes it easiest for most people to produce a pure-in-line stroke is the parallel-palms grip (Figure 4.10.15). By parallel I mean the palms and the backs of both hands are parallel to the putterface which means they are perpendicular to the intended putt-line. Most golfers’ arms hang naturally in this parallel position they find it equally natural to swing their arms hack and through perpendicular to their shoulder line (Figure 4.10.16) and this motion is both easy to repeat and promotes a consistent position through impact. However if it proves uncomfortable for you try putting your hands on your putter shaft in the same positions that they hang naturally (without manipulation) under your shoulders (Figure 4.10.17).

Many other grips are possible including the “open palm ” “left-hand-low ” “claw ” “fingertip ” and “equal-pressure” grips. How to best use these and other grips will be discussed in section 11.6 along with how you can develop the best grip for your putting stroke.

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Harburn Golf Club

Now, I’ll take you into the follow-through. This will be simple. Basically just keep turning around your spine. If you have flipped your wrists correctly, you won’t have to bother too much with the follow through. However, there is a basic position that you should be in when you finish the swing. You should be facing the target, and your right and left forearms should be crossed. Your right forearm should be closest to you, and the club should be out towards left field.

Harburn Golf Club