Grimsby Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Grimsby Golf Club

About Grimsby Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Grimsby Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Grimsby Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Grimsby Golf Club

The course is set in 123 acres of undulating parkland and was designed by renowned Course Architect, Harry S. Colt (responsible for Sunningdale, Royal Portrush etc.) and is regarded as a classic design.A wonderful feature of the course is that virtually every hole changes direction. If you don’t keep your eye on the wind you can be in serious trouble. At 6057 yards and a par of 70 it certainly produces a challenging test to any golfer. It is renowned for its short holes and can claim some of the best par 3’s in the county, namely the 2nd, 6th, 9th and 13th.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

Improve Your Stroke Mechanics 271 short sessions are more beneficial than infrequent long sessions).

The Putting Track is the king of stroke-path feedback devices because it defines the perfect path for your stroke and never lies about how you are doing: You’ll hear and feel when you make a bad stroke while you’ll hear nothing and feel pure “nothingness” when you make a good one. The Track is inexpensive easy to set up and use and you can take it with you when you travel. It works at home in your office

272 Improve Your Stroke Mechanics anywhere you have even a few minutes of free time (many Tour pros work with it at night in their hotel rooms). But it’s crucial that you set it up properly and practice carefully. Some tracks don’t have lines to show when your putter is square; others don’t curve upward to follow your stroke all the way back and through. Use only ones with both because practice without feedback is a waste of time.

Always aim the track carefully standing behind it to ensure it is aligned precisely at your target soda can (when you sight with one eye your putter shaft should run exactly through the middle of the track and the can as shown in Figure 12.1.3). Use a book to keep balls from actually hitting and moving the can. (You don ‘t need to see where the balls roll – who cares how the carpet breaks?) This drill isn’t about the ball but about improving the “in-line-ness” of your stroke path so keep your focus on making good strokes that don’t make noise by touching the rails of the track at any time.

High-Intensity Feedback

Start with the track set up to provide one inch of total space (roughly half an inch on each side) between your putter and the side rails and count how many of your strokes make noise by hitting the sides of the track. You want to set this space tolerance so you hit a rail on about 50 percent of your strokes as that percentage is perfect for rapid learning from maximum feedback. You may have to adjust the rails for more or less space to achieve this level of performance (Figure 12.1.4). Practice about 10 minutes (about 50 putts) each session multiple sessions ea&

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

5.2 Touch and Feel Are in the Mind’s Eye

The skill bases for your touch and feel (green-reading will be discussed in Chapter 7) are intermingled in your mind. They are also intermingled in that they have a combined effect on putting results. But each is a separate skill which can be learned and developed over time.

Touch is in your head but it begins with knowing what your putt looks like and remembering (knowing based on past experience) how much power (the size or intensity of stroke) was required in the past for similar putts. Touch is an acquired skill based on past experiences. It resides in your memory bank and plays a part in creating the mind’s-eye picture of the size of stroke you need.

Before you can develop a good feel for a putt you need to have a good idea for how long it is and how much power will be required to roll it the proper speed and distance: In other words you need to have touch. Given that feel for the putt involves having a good idea of how to apply the power which will be needed to roll the ball at the optimum speed along that line to allow it to break into the hole. Having good feel for a putt is having the idea or picture in your mind’s eye of how the stroke will look and feel in both rhythm and intensity as it rolls the ball to the hole. So a part of feel is in your head. Feel also involves a kinesthetic awareness for the violence (or nonviolence) of your swing and knowing the physical sensation to expect at impact including the vibrations that will travel up the shaft after the putter strikes the ball. It is based on the feel of your collected experience from thousands of swings you’ve made on previous putts and the results they produced. This feel is produced in your nerve endings fingers arms and shoulders in the muscles of all of these entities as well as in your brain and memory.

Is one part of feel more important than any other? I don’t know. But more to the point I’m not sure I care. Because I do know that all these factors are necessary for good putting and the end result feel ultimately is experiential. You’ve got to do it lots of times to learn it and know it.

Feel is knowing how to do it touch is knowing what to do. A golfer with good touch can have a had day physically when his body simply can ‘t execute what his brain knows he should do. On a day like this we’d say his feel is off. This golfer will be frustrated because he doesn’t seem to be able to do what he knows he can and needs to do. Compare that to a golfer with poor touch: He can have great feel and still never make a putt because if you choose the wrong speed yet roll it perfectly at that speed the results still won ‘t be very good. So poor-touch golfers are more likely to get bewildered than frustrated (Figure 5.2.1).

Five Nonphysical Building Blocks: Touch Feel Attitude Routine and Ritual 115

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Grimsby Golf Club

Notice that the right elbow becomes locked now as the right arm continues to swing. As you can see the right wrist has started to roll on top of the left wrist. The left elbow is now closer to the body, and is able to bend. The left elbow cannot be completely stopped at the imaginary line, but just a hesitation is enough to let your hands swing through the ball. Notice that the triangle is still present.

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