Goring Streatley Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Goring & Streatley Golf Club

About Goring & Streatley Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Goring & Streatley Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Goring & Streatley Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Goring & Streatley Golf Club

Established in 1895, Goring & Streatley is an 18 hole, 6355 yard, par 71 golf course set in an area of outstanding natural beauty in West Berkshire with panoramic views of the Thames Valley.

Goring & Streatley Golf Club

Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

Due to the sun wind rain surrounding land features (mountains) and other influences grass usually grows to one side or another at least to some extent sometimes in more than one direction on the same green. Since your ball will roll on the grass for the majority of every putt this growth direction can have a noticeable effect on its movement.

For example if the grain between your ball and the hole is running from left to right and the slope of the green is also downhill left to right then the break will be even sharper in that direction than if there were no grain. The putt also will roll farther because as it breaks more it begins to roll more with the grain. If the grain is strong and running from right to left and the slope is left to right the grain will minimize (and depending on the degree of the slope perhaps cancel or even override) the severity of the break and slow the putt a little.

Sometimes the most significant grain effects occur on putts that go directly

Green-Reading the 15th Building Block 169 with or against the grain by changing both the amount of the break and the overall distance your putts will roll. If you putt against the grain (that is the grass is growing directly into the rolling ball) its speed will be slowed your putt won’t roll as far and all breaking putts will break a little more than normal (right side of Figure 7.10.2). Putting with the grain not only gives the ball extra speed and distance but also keeps it rolling more on-line and breaking less than normal (center ball track). On long putts the difference in rolling distances can be quite significant (Figure 7.10.3).

If you’ve played in the southern tier of the United Slates you’ve probably putted on Bermuda grass which has broad bristly leaves and a sparse growing pattern and can be especially grainy. But bent grass which is found predominantly in the northern part of the country has grain too just not as strong. Wherever you play try to learn about the strength of the grain before you venture onto the course.

There are a few quick ways to judge the way the grain is running on any green. First look to see if it’s obvious – that is if you can sec that the blades of grass lie all in one direction. Remember grass tends to grow toward water and the sun so look that way first. Then check if you can see the sun ‘s reflection on the grass: If the grass appears whitish or shiny it means the grain is growing away from you; if the grass looks darker you’re seeing a little shade under the blades as you look into the tip ends which means the grain is growing toward you.

Goring & Streatley Golf Club

The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

Of course good touch and feel also require a proper read of the green knowing what will happen to your putt as it rolls. Think of green-reading as having a good road map for your journey. A good map or good directions can make the trip easy but a bad map with poor directions can turn the simplest trip into a nightmare.

So you need a map enough gas and the knowledge of how hard to step on the gas pedal along the way. You need all these things in concert to have a good trip. And you need good feel touch and green-reading skills also working together to putt well. Leave one out or do one poorly and it will he the same as losing your way on your Thanksgiving trip. Feel touch and green-reading are separate skills essentially different in nature yet each needs to be developed to provide the best result. And in case I ‘ve confused you that result is to roll the ball into the hole.

5.2 Touch and Feel Are in the Mind’s Eye

The skill bases for your touch and feel (green-reading will be discussed in Chapter 7) are intermingled in your mind. They are also intermingled in that they have a combined effect on putting results. But each is a separate skill which can be learned and developed over time.

Touch is in your head but it begins with knowing what your putt looks like and remembering (knowing based on past experience) how much power (the size or intensity of stroke) was required in the past for similar putts. Touch is an acquired skill based on past experiences. It resides in your memory bank and plays a part in creating the mind’s-eye picture of the size of stroke you need.

Before you can develop a good feel for a putt you need to have a good idea for how long it is and how much power will be required to roll it the proper speed and distance: In other words you need to have touch. Given that feel for the putt involves having a good idea of how to apply the power which will be needed to roll the ball at the optimum speed along that line to allow it to break into the hole. Having good feel for a putt is having the idea or picture in your mind’s eye of how the stroke will look and feel in both rhythm and intensity as it rolls the ball to the hole. So a part of feel is in your head. Feel also involves a kinesthetic awareness for the violence (or nonviolence) of your swing and knowing the physical sensation to expect at impact including the vibrations that will travel up the shaft after the putter strikes the ball. It is based on the feel of your collected experience from thousands of swings you’ve made on previous putts and the results they produced. This feel is produced in your nerve endings fingers arms and shoulders in the muscles of all of these entities as well as in your brain and memory.

Is one part of feel more important than any other? I don’t know. But more to the point I’m not sure I care. Because I do know that all these factors are necessary for good putting and the end result feel ultimately is experiential. You’ve got to do it lots of times to learn it and know it.

Goring & Streatley Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Goring & Streatley Golf Club

First of all, it’s important that you realize that your grip will affect the results that you get. However, it’s not as complicated as the other systems make it out to be. First, grab the club with your right hand so the face of it is toward the target. Keep the face pointed toward the target, while placing your left hand on the bottom of the grip or handle. At this point you should be holding your left hand out flat, so that it is touching the bottom of the grip. Position the joint where your left pinky meets your palm directly underneath the handle of the club. Keep the pinky there and place the first joint in your left forefinger directly underneath the club. Now, do not lift your fingers up, bringing the grip of the club into your palm; instead, hold the handle steady with your left fingers and wrap your palm around the top of the grip. This is an important distinction. Again, don’t wrap the fingers towards the palm, but instead wrap your palm around the top of the club. Now, you should be able to easily place your left thumb directly on top of the club. This should form a V-shape where your left thumb and left forefinger meet. This V-shape should point directly to your right shoulder when it’s complete.

Goring & Streatley Golf Club