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Golf Lessons at Glenisla Golf Centre

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Golf Lessons at Glenisla Golf Centre

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Glenisla Golf Centre for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

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Designed to offer a challenge to the more serious golfer off the back tees, the club golfer will find forgiveness for all but the most wayward shots from the forward tees. The highly complimented course design is credited to Tony Wardle, who has worked alongside Robert Trent Jones and Jack Niklaus, incorporating terrain and natural hazzards.The course has a variety of holes which present different questions each time they are played.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

Don’t think learning is difficult. Learning how to aim is entirely instinctive once the golfer receives proper feedback (and he or she stops aiming based on where putts are missed). Learning how to make a pure-in-line-square stroke isn’t difficult. Nor is learning to keep the putterface from rotating open and closed. Becoming aware of how putts break isn’t difficult. Something many people never realize (and not just in golf but in school at work in life) is that learning often doesn’t involve much thinking. If you are exposed to the right information (feedback) you can’t help but learn. It’s automatic – your subconscious does it for you.

Speaking of the subconscious realize that it is a very powerful force that can be used to help you improve or if you don’t use it correctly will keep you from improving. The subconscious will take over if given half a chance so you want the “habits” that it reverts to (under pressure when you’re nervous when you’re scared) to be good ones. And the way to get good habits into your subconscious is to understand what they are and then practice them – properly.

Indoor Learning

Putting stroke mechanics are best learned indoors (away from the practice putting green) with immediate accurate and reliable feedback from appropriate learning-aid devices (for details see Chapters 11 12 and 13). Elimination of the hole and where the ball is going to roll is a major benefit to such practice. By eliminating the distraction of making or missing putts you can focus on what you are trying to learn get feedback on how you’re doing and learn faster and more efficiently (Figure I5.3.1).

This is very different from practice for the full swing where hitting balls at a driving range can provide benefits intuitively (when you make a good driver swing you see a good drive; when you make a good 8-iron swing you see a good 8-iron shot; when you make bad swings you see bad shots). A driving range is a relatively good learning environment for the full swing. However practicing putting is nothing like that. Most golfers miss putts when they’re “practicing” on a putting green and have no idea why. The reason is they ‘re not getting reliable helpful feedback and more practice doesn’t help the situation.

Outdoor Learning

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

Having said this there is one situation in which I recommend either hitting up on your putts or using a more-lofted-than-normal putter. When you find yourself putting on soft and severely bumpy greens you might want to try launching your short puns slightly upward to avoid the footprints that would send them squirting left or right. True this is not a great stroke but on truly bad surfaces it may be the least had of your options.

Spinning Puffs

Forget here and now the idea of imparting spin as a way to control your putts. Research has shown that the friction of the green removes all spin from rolling halls

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 93 within about the first 20 percent of their roll. Despite this golfers think that Ben Crenshaw became a good putter by learning to put overspin on his putts and that Bobby Locke put “hook spin” on his putts which made them dive into the hole. Neither of these descriptions is true but amateur golfers believe them because they sound reasonable and give them something new to try in their own putting. (They also give amateurs an excuse for not putting better. Trust me: Most amateurs don’t need any more excuses.)

Still many golfers and even some teaching professionals extol the benefits of “releasing” the putter through impact rotating the face from open to closed to impart hook spin or overspin. Again all reasonably well-stroked putts can be shown to be rolling without any spin whatsoever when they reach the hole. So trying to release the putter makes no sense unless it encourages you to follow through in your stroke and eliminates deceleration and instability. However even in this case releasing the putter will produce more face rotation and give you more inconsistency in directional control due to increased timing problems.

The Razor-Blade Putter

Because so many people assume that putts can spin all the way to the hole and are obsessed with the idea of overspin I built a putter that let me examine and evaluate the benefit of true overspin. I embedded a razor blade just above the center of a putterface (Figure 4.9.4) making sure the sharp edge of the blade would contact the ball above its geometric center and impart true overspin.

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

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The right elbow should remain locked to your right side throughout the backswing. As you can see, the left arm is still locked as well.This step is included for many reasons. First, it helps you swing around your spine and promotes a correct shoulder turn. It’s really hard to move your body horizontally, while keeping your right elbow locked to your side at the same time. Secondly, it prevents the “flying elbow.” The flying elbow produces everything from a slice to a wicked hook, depending on what you do with your hands in conjunction with it. So, keeping your elbow in contact with your side will help tremendously in assuring that you swing around your body, every single time. Third, it’s a power-producing move because it will put you in a position to easily flip your hands through the ball. Fourth, keeping your right elbow locked to your side will give you a great point of reference. It keeps your swing plane correct, and is a great indicator of when to stop the back swing. Finally, it helps you to “stay connected” throughout the swing. If you have your right elbow locked at your side, it will be hard to swing your arms without rotating your shoulders and visa versa.

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