Glamorganshire Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Glamorganshire Golf Club

About Glamorganshire Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Glamorganshire Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Glamorganshire Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Glamorganshire Golf Club

The Glamorganshire Golf Club, situated in the seaside town of Penarth on the outskirts of Cardiff is the second oldest golf club in South Wales.Although being near the sea, the Glamorganshire is not a links, but an 18-hole parkland course on undulating ground on the edge of what are now Cosmeston Lakes.The Club is steeped in tradition – it was at the Glamorganshire that the Stableford scoring system was first tried by its creator, Dr. Frank Stableford in September 1898, and when the Barbarian Rugby Football Club made Penarth their home in 1901 for their traditional Easter tour to Wales, the Glamorganshire was adopted as the place to spend the free Sunday.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

350 Face Your Special Problems been playing in the last group on Sunday because they had become really good at these shots. They have practiced them over the years with many different clubs and they knew how to hit these shots. You must practice these shots with your putter (or whatever club) to find out when it will and when it won’t work for you. Simply choosing the right club won’t solve this problem if you don’t know how to hit it.

14.4 Putting on Slopes

Do you have difficulty stopping your uphill or downhill putts near the cup? Many golfers do and I think one reason is that how long a putt looks can be very deceiving on sloped surfaces. Just as 1 showed in Chapter 4 that a putterface swinging pure-in-line and square along the Aimline can appear to be rotating depending on where your eyes (or a camera lens) are located it is also true that the length of a sloping putt can appear to be different when viewed from different positions.

Look at the three 10-foot putts illustrated in Figure 14.4.1. While all three distances are the same from the balls to the holes they appear to be different when viewed by a golfer standing vertically over his ball in the address position. The discrepancies occur because in each case the eyes of the player are a different distance from the hole (even though the balls are not). The funny thing is that on uphill

Face Your Special Problems 351 putts which need to be given more energy the distance always appears shorter than it really is while on downhill putts which should be rolled more carefully and with less energy the distance appears longer.

I’ve already recommended that you can improve your touch by stepping off the distance of your putts. It’s even more important to do this when putting on sloped surfaces or where there are significant uphill or downhill areas between your ball and the hole. Just be sure – and this is important – that you walk in both directions on a sloping green and average your number of steps because you ‘ ll take different-length steps when walking uphill versus downhill.

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

And that is what you see if you look at many putting greens today. Golfers practicing practicing and practicing – who knows what they are practicing? – all hoping their putting will improve. Some of them practice a different thing every day and use a different stroke in every round. Some golfers even use several differ ent strokes during one round. Yes sir-ee they remind me of a bunch of pigeons!

Something else you need to think about before actually beginning to work on your stroke are the answers to a few questions. They are important questions but only if you want to know just how good your putting can get: (1) How good are the world’s best putters? (2) How well do you putt now? (3) How good can one get at putting? (4) How good will your putting be in the future?

Let me answer these as best I can:

I believe the best putters in the world are playing on the PGA Tour. My proof is the results of the first two World Putting Championships where the Tour pros were seriously challenged by some Senior Tour players several LPGA Tour players and a number of amateurs both young and old. However the PGA Tour players placed higher as a group than any other.

Also my data on the percentage of putts holed from different distances shows that the PGA Tour players lead all other groups. Don’t think that you can look at the statistics quoted in the newspapers and find this information because the number that the papers publish (provided by the Tour) simply show how many putts the players average on greens hit in regulation which is affected by the quality of their iron shots (the better the iron play the shorter their putts). And these are the new putting stats. Years ago the Tour’s statistics measured putts taken per green which was influenced by how many greens players missed and how consistently they chipped close to the hole (again leaving them shorter putts). Neither of these statistics measures the quality of a player’s putting because both are strongly influenced by the quality of different shots (approaches and chips).

The true measure of the Tour pros’ putting is indicated by the percentage of putts they make (“convert”) based solely on the length of the putts (shown in Figure 1.4.1 page 7). The shaded curve is data on PGA Tour players taken between the years 1977 and 1992 and shows the spread between the best and worst conversion percentages. It has now been almost 10 years since we measured how well the pros putt and the Pelz Golf Institute is in the process of repeating this test. We hope we’ll find that the percentages have changed in recent years (they remained fairly consistent in the period from ’87 to ’92) as the conditions of greens improve and as players improve their skills (and perhaps as some of our teaching is taking effect).

If you want an answer to question 2 – “How well do you putt?” – you must measure your percentage of putts holed from each distance. You can do this but it will take some effort. You have to record the distance of each putt on your scorecard as you move around the course and indicate those you hole. After 10 to 15

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Glamorganshire Golf Club

Now that you have the proper grip with your left hand, we can focus on the right hand. Take your right hand and place it underneath the handle of the club. Lift up your left forefinger from underneath the club so it can move freely. Interlock your right picky with your left forefinger.

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