Gifford Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Gifford Golf Club

About Gifford Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Gifford Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Gifford Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Gifford Golf Club

The Club was formed in 1904 when Lord Tweeddale, a keen golfer, leased 50 acres of the family estate for a nominal rent of £5 a year – ‘for the whole right and privilege of playing golf’. In 1968, the late Lord Tweeddale bequested the land to three local Trustees – ‘for behoof of the inhabitants of the village of Gifford’. The lease was renewed at the sum of one penny, if asked for! This quaint arrangement reflects the unique village atmosphere of the Club today.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

I mentioned in Chapter 13 the had effects of three-putting and how it can be reduced. I’ll repeat what I said then: Golfers three-putt so frequently they would save more strokes by eliminating three-putts than they would by learning to make more first putts.

Look at the illustration of two lag-putt patterns in (Figure 14.2.1) for 60-foot putts. The pattern on the left is typical for golfers in the 20- to 25-handicap range while the pattern on the right represents a typical lag-putt pattern for 5- to 10handicap players. The pattern size for the lower-handicap players is about half

Face Your Special Problems 347 that of the higher-handicapper’s pattern. This improvement while only by a factor of two drastically reduces the frequency of three-putting for these players.

How great is this improvement? It ‘s between three and five shots per round. And there is an additional benefit too. If you can decrease the size of your lag-putt pattern by a factor of two you’ll make four times as many of those putts. Decrease the pattern size by a factor of three and you’ll hole nine times more putts. (The probability of lag putts finding the hole is proportional to the ratio of the hole radius to the radius of your lag-putt pattern squared.) Although this won’t change your score as much as eliminating your three-putts (because the probability of making these long putts is small to begin with) it ‘s always nice to hole a long one now and then.

As I have asked you to do several times in this book it’s time again to measure something about your game. The question is: Do you have a three-putting problem? Do you three-putt on average more than once per round? If you do that qualifies as a problem. Keep track of your three-putts on your scorecard at the same time you mark your above (A) and below (B) putting misses. Count up your total number of three-putts over 10 rounds add them all together divide by 10 and come up with your average number of three-puns per round. Compare this number with one three-putt every four rounds of golf which is what the touring professionals average.

You don’t have to three-putt often. I’ve worked with PGA Tour players who ( when putting well) three-putt only five to 10 times all year while playing 72 holes almost every week on some of the most difficult courses and greens in the world. How do you think they do it? They practice hard hit their puns consistently solidly on the sweetspot and convert their short putts. If they can do it you can too.

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

Another Variation on a Theme

Someone else started with Snead’s sidesaddle style and made a modification of his own which produced the best putting I’ve seen to this day. Rather than using a standard-length (roughly 35-inch) putter a fellow came to me putting sidesaddle but with a longer-than-normal (about 42-inch) putter (Figure 3.3.3). He stood beside the putting line facing the hole and swung the putter along a perfect vertical pendulum with his top hand and the top of the putter tucked under his armpit. He leaned over to set his eyes directly over the putting line then balanced his weight by extending one foot away from the line.

I can’t remember the name of the man who figured this out but I give him credit: He found something that really does work. He started every putt by standing directly behind the ball and pointed from his ball to a spot out in front of it on his intended starting line. Then he addressed the ball and again pointed down the line to make sure he was aligned correctly. Finally he stroked the ball and held his finish pointing at the same spot again exactly down the putt starting line.

This technique produced the consistently best putting I’ve ever seen and it is legal. But I’m certain that if someone switches to this style and starts winning with it the USGA probably will ban it.

One of the tenets of the USGA the ruling body of golf is to protect and maintain the integrity of the game in part by preserving its challenge and difficulty. I support this noble purpose and think most golfers feel the same way. If we lost the challenge in the game it wouldn’t be nearly so much fun. Having said that we all want to make our own putting strokes simpler so we can hole more putts score better and enjoy the game to its fullest.

In keeping with their tradition of maintaining the game’s challenge the USGA would prefer that golfers putt in what they describe as the “traditional style.” While this technique is not as simple or easy as the methods described above it’s not necessarily all that difficult either. Lots of putts have been and will be made the USGA way.

Up to this point I have been going from the easiest to more difficult ways to putt. Now I have to reverse that. In discussing the following ways to putt all of which conform to the Rules I will begin with the most difficult and work down to what I perceive to be the easiest way to putt.

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Gifford Golf Club

The chest and shoulders shouldn’t be turning, unless your arms are turning with them. In other words, you want to start your swing with a shoulder turn, but your arms should start swinging at EXACTLY the same time. They are an extension. They are connected. Furthermore, your arms shouldn’t be swinging unless your chest is rotating. Don’t start swinging your arms without starting the shoulder turn. They are connected. Your left elbow remains locked throughout the entire swing. When you complete your shoulder turn, your arms should stop as well. The goal will be to have your left arm exactly parallel to the ground. Your elbow is still locked. When it gets there…STOP. Do not continue to swing your arms.

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