Fulneck Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Fulneck Golf Club

About Fulneck Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Fulneck Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Fulneck Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Fulneck Golf Club

We are very pleased that you have decided to visit our site and we hope that you enjoy the journey through our past, the achievements of Members old and new and our commitment to the Club’s future. As the oldest Golf Club in Leeds, we are very proud of our heritage. Please look at our history page for a condensed look at the Club’s past.

Fulneck Golf Club

Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

13.2.3. First putt around the triangle in a clockwise direction from the outside of each hole. Then putt around again in the clockwise direction but this time from the inside of each hole. After these six putts play the triangle counterclockwise from both inside and outside of the triangle. You’ve tried 12 different putts four of each distance. By walking (and remembering) only three distances you can test your touch to sense the subtle differences required for each of the four putting situations (back and forth inside and outside the triangle) to each hole.

Edge-of-Green Drill putting to the far edge of the practice green is a good drill for a course you don’t know. It will both acquaint you with the speed of the greens and warm up your stroke mechanics. Take three balls and walk off the distance from one edge of the green to another. putt that distance back to where you started from (Figure 13.2.4).

Develop Your Artistic Senses (Feel Touch Green-Reading) 307 trying to roll each putt exactly to the edge of the green without touching it. As you walk to your three balls notice if you were putting with or against the grain. Then putt the balls back in the opposite direction over the same distance to the edge of the green to see if you can detect any differences caused by the grain. Doing this several times won’t take long and will adjust your touch for the unfamiliar greens.

“Draw-Back” is the best game of all for developing and refining touch for putts longer than 35 feet. Because the odds of making long putts are so poor the real skill in lag putting is rolling your putts consistently close to the hole taking the pressure off your short putting and eliminating any chance of three-putting. And Draw-Back is designed to develop exactly that skill. (The rules are listed in Figure 13.2.5.)

The reward in Draw-Back comes in lagging your first putt close enough to the hole so that after drawing it back 34 inches the next putt is significantly less than six feet so the probability of making it is great. You can play Draw-Back by yourself but you will learn far more quickly if you play nine-hole games in competition with good lag putters and with something at stake. (1 don’t want to encourage gambling for money you might not have but you need to care about winning each hole and each game if you are to see maximum improvement.)

Never play Draw-Back on putts of less than 35 feet. If you do the training to your subconscious is to lag those close rather than trying to maximize your make-percentage by rolling them 17 inches past the hole.

Fulneck Golf Club

The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

This is a point worth repeating because most golfers don’t think enough about the speed of their putts. Rather they focus on line. If you are a “line” putter try putting with a pool cue or a True Roller and I promise you’ll learn to appreciate the importance of speed in making putts.

3.3 It Gets More Difficult

So we’ve disposed of two methods that no one can or should be allowed to use. What about some techniques that have been tried and in some cases are still in use?

Croquet-Style

Next on the “easiness” scale (which means it’s a little more difficult than the techniques above) is standing so you face the putting line and putt croquet-style between your legs. Yes this really has been used. Bob Duden and Bob Shave Jr. two PGA Tour pros who had been struggling with their putting used this technique back in the 1960s. I’ve never been sure whether the USGA banned this method because it was too easy too nontraditional or it just looked bad when viewed from behind. It certainly made putting easier because it gave the golfer the best view of the line before the putt and a clear view of what the ball was doing immediately after it started to roll.

Both of these views provide critically important feedback that golfers generally miss when putting in the conventional style (that is standing to the side of the line). Croquet-style putting has other benefits: It removes all rotational motion of the forearms (which opens and closes the putterface during conventional putting) it forces the wrists to remain solid (no breakdown) and it creates the perfect in-line stroke path straight down the intended putting line.

Croquet putting is so easy that it was used by no less a legend than Sam Snead in the mid-1960s (when he was in his mid-fifties) to counter a case of the yips. Snead actually putted this way (Figure 3.3.1) – with one foot on either side of the target line – during the 1966 PGA Championship where he finished tied for sixth. Perhaps it was seeing the great Samuel Jackson Snead putt from the wrong direction or perhaps it was deemed to reduce the skill required to play the game – in any case croquet-style putting was quickly outlawed by golf’s powers that be.

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Fulneck Golf Club

Please start with the three pictures below. Understand that the point of these pictures is to get your arms and chest connected. You should understand the feeling of “being connected” before you try to incorporate this critical step into your golf swing. If you hold the club straight out in front of you, there will be a triangle formed between your arms and chest. Just focus on keeping the triangle between your arms and chest fixed. Just move your arms with your chest. When your chest stops rotating, your arms also stop. Please see the three pictures below and try it out. Turn to your right, then back around to your left, keeping the triangle between your arms and chest constant at all times.

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