Forrester Park Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Forrester Park Golf Club

About Forrester Park Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Forrester Park Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Forrester Park Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Forrester Park Golf Club

Set within its own grounds in rural Essex, the beautiful house at Forrester Park, parts of which date back to the 16th Century, has been lovingly converted in a welcoming, traditional Clubhouse and Function Rooms. A number of rooms are available for hire as well as a garden/patio area and exhibition site. There is ample car parking.

Forrester Park Golf Club

Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

There’s nothing good about “hitting” your putts. Using a hit is disastrous under pressure while trying to control distance with a hit stroke requires providing a different amount of force and a different rhythm to every putt totally eliminating consistency. There is no way a player can anticipate executing a different stroke on every putt on every green as well as an equally talented person can learn to execute the same stroke at the same rhythm changing only the length of the swing.

Look at the color photographs (see insert in the center) of some of the best putters in the world. From George Archer and Ben Crenshaw probably the two best ever to Brad Faxon Loren Roberts Lee Janzen Dave Stockton Bob Charles and Phil Mickelson each has a beautiful smooth flowing and – most important – rhythmic putting stroke. Each one has a rhythm that tends to be the same day after day week after week year in and year out for all of their putts. if you think these guys are just lucky when they putt then you haven’ t watched them. They all have reasonably good mechanical stroke actions (although none are perfect) so their putters remain stable through impact. And they all have great rhythm. Even on their bad putting days they almost make most of their putts burning the edges of the cups. The reason for their consistency? Rhythm.

Rhythm is the glue of these great strokes but these guys don’t own the patent on rhythm. As you will see in section 11.3 anyone can improve his or her rhythm and I’ve never seen anyone who hasn’t putted better for it. Good setup alignment touch feel green-reading and stroke mechanics are all necessary for good putting. But without a constant and repeatable rhythm preferably one that is in sync with the natural cadence of your body you will never become a great putter. Never. And that’s a fact.

Green-Reading the 15th Building Block

7.1 Houston – We Have a Problem

When the world-famous phrase “Houston – We have a problem” was transmitted from the Apollo 13 spacecraft back to earth it signified one of the most profound understatements of all time. It came as a calm voice from a spacecraft on its way to the moon to the Houston ground-control command center from an astronaut who while petrified with fear understood that he had a real problem (there had been an explosion on board his spacecraft; Figure 7.1.1). However no one on Earth understood the magnitude of the problem. Ground control had lost all normal monitor and status signals and nothing they saw on their control-system panels made any sense. They were sure the crazy array of warning signals and lights out-of-tolerance levels and emergency-warning systems had to be some malfunction of their ground-control systems. The ground controllers thought “This can’t be real because for these readings to be correct the spacecraft would have to explode.”

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

Then they show me a photo like Figure 4.7.3. Now I want to show you something. Look at the photographs in Figure 4.7.4. On the left you see Perfy my putting robot making a pure-in-line-square stroke with his hands vertically under his shoulders. In the center photograph the perpendicular gridlines show that his putterface stays perfectly square all the way down the line and the right side of the figure shows an incoming view of the same stroke (with different lines to show how perfectly on-line his stroke stays). Okay? You agree Perfy makes a pils stroke from this hands-under-shoulders (vertical pendulum) set-up?

In Figure 4.7.5 I put the camera perfectly face-on to Perfy as he makes the same pils stroke but this time I moved in a little closer and removed the gridlines to emphasize the effect. Now doesn’t that putterface look like it’s rotating screen-dooring through impact? I promise you it is not! Perfy’s swing was no different; it’s only the appearance (an optical illusion) that has changed.

My point is great putters have their putterfaces square to their Aimlines through impact what you see in photographs on TV or in person notwithstanding. That’s one of the reasons they putt so well. If the camera is not on-line or if gridlines aren’t present to reference your vision you can’t believe what you see because of the optical illusions. Even standing face-on watching a player putt at a tournament your eyes (and those of playing and teaching pros) deceive you in the same way. You’ve got to get your eyes (or the camera) either on-line or vertically above a swing motion to see if it’s on-line and rotating or not (as in Figure 4.7.2 where you can accurately compare the rotation of screen-door vs. pits stroke motions).

82 The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics it’s important to realize that the putter shaft is not the pendulum of the stroke and the lie of the putter shaft does not affect the path of your stroke unless it makes you move your hands. Figure 4.7.6 shows the path of a vertical pendulum stroke with two different putters with different shaft angles: You can see that both swing in a pure-in-line-square motion all the way.

Everyone Can Swing On-Line and Square

Away from physics and hack to golf. As long as your putting triangle (Figure 4.7.7) remains intact so the elbow and wrist angles don’t change during the stroke and your forearms don’t rotate there is a position of your hands somewhere under your shoulders that will produce a pure-in-line-square stroke. This stroke is perfectly natural with no involvement of the muscles of your hands wrists or forearms. This lack of hand action is what we call a “dead-hands” stroke. (Note: The perfect vertical pendulum hand position can be influenced by the musculature of your shoulders and arms. Golfers with either very muscular or slender arms may find the spot isn’t precisely under their shoulders – but pretty close – due to the weight balance of the arms hands and putter.)

You’ve now had it proven that it is not only possible but also natural to swing your putter in a pure straight-line motion without any hand or forearm manipulations. And it’s equally possible and natural to swing your putter around or away from your body. Which stroke do you think lets you putt best? To me it’s obvious that the pure-in-line-square (pils) stroke is the simplest and best way to putt.

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Forrester Park Golf Club

Really flip your right wrist through the ball. This action will give you a lot more club head speed. It also eliminates any slice that you may have had because your left elbow isn’t flying on the follow through anymore. So, essentially you’re keeping the left elbow close to the body now. Before it was your right, and now it’s your left elbow that you are keeping tight to your body. Keep your left elbow close to your body, and flip the right wrist through the ball at the same time. You should feel the extra power this gives you.

Forrester Park Golf Club