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Golf Lessons at Flixton Golf Club

About Flixton Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Flixton Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Flixton Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

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Many people set out to play a gentle nine hole parkland course thinking that this will be easy. Well… if you hit the ball straight you’re part way there; if you don’t there are trees, bushes and nameless other things in the very spots where you don’t want them. it could be said that position is the key to golf at Flixton. On the other hand, Flixton is one of the longest nine hole courses in the area so straightness isn’t enough; if you can’t hit a long ball you won’t get up. The problem escalate.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

336 Develop Your Artistic Senses (Feel Touch Green-Reading)

You do this by practicing breaking putts with your Elevated Aimline marked and guarded on the high side. How to set up this condition is shown in Figure 13.4.10.

The Elevated Aimline stakes are connected by elastic thread which is suspended nine inches above the Aimline of your putt. The blocking plate (a book soda

1) read putt; 2) mark your ball spot; 3) place Elevated Aimline stake where you read true-break point; 4) install Elevated Aimline precisely over ball by placing second stake two feet behind ball; 5) locate blocking plate 1/4 inch above second ball which is 17 inches ahead of ball spot under Elevated Aimline.

Develop Your Artistic Senses (Feel Touch Green-Reading) 337 can or almost anything else) is positioned just above your starting line (Aimline) to prevent your subconscious from pulling or pushing your putts uphill.

If you set up to putt as in the example above your first few putts probably will hit the blocking plate as shown in Figure 13.4.11. (I’ve seen thousands of golfers do this) so don’t think you’re the only one.) The subconscious of most golfers reverts to habit and pushes the first few putts a little uphill into the blocking plate (shown on the left). Then when you finally get your first putt to roll past the blocking plate without hitting it (shown on right) the ball will probably miss the hole on the low side of the cup if your speed was anywhere near the optimum (17 inches past the cup). The low miss happens because the Aimline most golfers choose initially is too low and doesn’t allow for enough break once their normal compensation uphill is blocked.

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 69 in such a way that the adrenaline-affected muscles of your fingers hands and wrists don’t control how far or fast your putts roll. You’ll learn about that in section 13.5.

Forearm Rotation

Just about every shot in golf except putting requires rotation of the forearms through the impact zone. But apply that same rotation to your putting stroke and you’ll produce double trouble. First your putterface will rotate from open to closed so the likelihood that it is square at the moment of impact becomes very small. Second forearm rotation supplies unwanted and unnecessary power and usually a lot of it.

But there’s yet another problem with forearm rotation: it feels natural. Even Tour professionals don’t realize they’re doing it and when I tell them to stop they usually say “What do you mean I’m not rotating my arms! ” But of course they are. And like the pros most golfers don’ t mean to do it and if you ask them don’t think they are. But they are and you probably are too. Which is too bad because forearm rotation makes putting more difficult more inconsistent and less effective.

You’ll have to wait until Chapter 13 to learn how to stop rotating your forearms. For now however make a mental note that you will stop making this destructive motion. It will be one of your challenges in improving your putting and a crucial one.

Body Power

In the previous chapter I talked about body putting something rarely seen among the pros because it’s a bad thing to do. Your body is large and the big muscles of the chest back and legs are strong particularly when compared to the small amounts of power needed to roll a ball on the fast surface of a putting green. Still many golfers put too much of their body into the stroke rotating the lower body sliding the lower body toward the hole or moving the upper body away from the hole (Figure 4.5.2). All these motions are unintentional (at least I hope so) but they still produce unwanted power and directional instability.

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Flixton Golf Club

The right elbow should remain locked to your right side throughout the backswing. As you can see, the left arm is still locked as well.This step is included for many reasons. First, it helps you swing around your spine and promotes a correct shoulder turn. It’s really hard to move your body horizontally, while keeping your right elbow locked to your side at the same time. Secondly, it prevents the “flying elbow.” The flying elbow produces everything from a slice to a wicked hook, depending on what you do with your hands in conjunction with it. So, keeping your elbow in contact with your side will help tremendously in assuring that you swing around your body, every single time. Third, it’s a power-producing move because it will put you in a position to easily flip your hands through the ball. Fourth, keeping your right elbow locked to your side will give you a great point of reference. It keeps your swing plane correct, and is a great indicator of when to stop the back swing. Finally, it helps you to “stay connected” throughout the swing. If you have your right elbow locked at your side, it will be hard to swing your arms without rotating your shoulders and visa versa.

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