Flamborough Head Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Flamborough Head Golf Club

About Flamborough Head Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Flamborough Head Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Flamborough Head Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Flamborough Head Golf Club

Founded in 1931 this warm and friendly club perched high on the cliff tops overlooking the North Sea is the ideal place to enjoy your golf. Recently extended the course is now a 6189 yards par 71 test for any level of golfer to enjoy. The cliffs which drop steeply from the boundaries of the course are home to a large variety of sea birds, including the colourful and comical puffin. The lucky visitor may also see seals basking in the sea below the cliffs.

Flamborough Head Golf Club

Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

To measure green speed three balls are rolled in one direction on the green measuring how far each ball rolls (in feet) from the end of the Stimpmeter. The same three balls then are rolled in the opposite direction over the same section of the green and again the distances are measured. The six distances are averaged to produce a quantitative measurement of the average distance a ball rolls on that green called the green speed. A slow green is about a 7 (meaning the balls rolled an average of 7 feet) while a fast green comes in at about a 10. Most PGA tournaments aim for green speeds between 10.5 and 11. When greens start rolling at 12 to 13 they are called “Augusta fast ” because that’s often the speed of the greens at Augusta National Golf Club home of The Masters every spring.

Longer rolls (from higher green speeds) for longer times mean the friction of

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 63 the green surface is low letting balls roll farther and longer. A rapidly slowing and short roll off a Stimpmeter means the friction of the green surface is high and the green speed is very slow.

Green speed always affects a putt’s speed and direction of roll (except on dead flat greens where direction is straight no matter what the speed). And the combination of green speed the amount of energy transferred to a putt and the influence of contours and slopes on the greens determines the results of your putts based on how much the putt truly breaks your putt’s initial Aimline and starting speed.

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics

Seven of the 15 building blocks of putting deal with stroke mechanics. By the end of this chapter you should understand them and how they affect your ability to putt. These seven fundamentals (Figure 4.4.1) have the most to do with determining the quality of a putting stroke and its results. They are not the only mechanical factors but they are the primary ones and the ones we are most concerned with in our schools. They are your aim power source putter path putterface angle impact point flow lines and putter fitting. If you understand and improve these seven fundamentals you will roll better putts. If you also can understand how to read greens better and learn to have better putting feel and touch then there is no question but that you will also make more putts.

Flamborough Head Golf Club

The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

Green Speed

The speed of the surface of the green or green speed affects a ball’s roll in speed direction and amount of break. I ‘m sure you have heard greens referred to as “fast ” “slow ” “quick ” “slick ” or “sticky.” Technically the speed of the green is determined by the frictional characteristics of the surface of the green which is controlled primarily by the length type density and moisture content of the grass (more on this in Chapter 7). Golf course superintendents traditionally measure the speed characteristics of greens using a device called the Stimpmeter. much speed (left) and perfect speed (right) for two putts rolled on the same starting line.

The Stimpmeter developed years ago by a man named Edward Stimpson is a crude yet simple way to measure how far a ball will roll on a flat portion of a green when it is given a standard starting speed. The USGA-approved version of a

Stimpmeter is a solid straight piece of aluminum extruded at a 30-degree angle with an indentation near the top and a beveled bottom (Figure 4.3.2). The beveled bottom allows the Stimpmeter to sit low to the green surface and reduce the bounce of a ball rolling down the channel when it hits the green.

The Stimpmeter was designed to release balls onto a green surface with constant initial speed (energy).

Measuring Green Speed To use a Stimpmeter a ball is placed in the indentation and the device is raised slowly until the ball rolls free and down the groove onto the green (Figure 4.3.3). Care must he taken to hold the Stimpmeter still as the ball rolls down the ramp to ensure constant release energy and ball speed at the bottom of the ramp.

To measure green speed three balls are rolled in one direction on the green measuring how far each ball rolls (in feet) from the end of the Stimpmeter. The same three balls then are rolled in the opposite direction over the same section of the green and again the distances are measured. The six distances are averaged to produce a quantitative measurement of the average distance a ball rolls on that green called the green speed. A slow green is about a 7 (meaning the balls rolled an average of 7 feet) while a fast green comes in at about a 10. Most PGA tournaments aim for green speeds between 10.5 and 11. When greens start rolling at 12 to 13 they are called “Augusta fast ” because that’s often the speed of the greens at Augusta National Golf Club home of The Masters every spring.

Flamborough Head Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Flamborough Head Golf Club

Please start with the three pictures below. Understand that the point of these pictures is to get your arms and chest connected. You should understand the feeling of “being connected” before you try to incorporate this critical step into your golf swing. If you hold the club straight out in front of you, there will be a triangle formed between your arms and chest. Just focus on keeping the triangle between your arms and chest fixed. Just move your arms with your chest. When your chest stops rotating, your arms also stop. Please see the three pictures below and try it out. Turn to your right, then back around to your left, keeping the triangle between your arms and chest constant at all times.

Flamborough Head Golf Club