Felixstowe Ferry Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Felixstowe Ferry Golf Club

About Felixstowe Ferry Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Felixstowe Ferry Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Felixstowe Ferry Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Felixstowe Ferry Golf Club

The Martello course at Felixstowe Ferry is one of the oldest in England, having been established in 1880. 18 holes 6285 yards, par 72 right next to the sea with fabulous views over the East Anglian Coast and the Deben Estuary. The course is gently undulating with testing borrows on the greens. Don’t be surprised if the wind blows! Visitors are welcome during the week-days only and with official handicaps.The Kingsfleet, 9 holes 2986 yards, par 35 is available for ‘Pay and Play’ to all comers. It offers pleasant views across the river Deben and marshes and is as much a challenge as the Martello having two par fives. This is not a pitch and putt course but a true test of golf.

Felixstowe Ferry Golf Club

Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

First they watch me make a stroke that is obviously not long enough. They say “No that’s no good. That will never get the ball to the hole.” Then I make too big a swing and ask “How about this?” and they say “No that’s way too much.” Finally I make a reasonable-sized swing (all three swings are shown in Figure 13.2.1) and they like it.

Then I tell them that they are using their touch to make these evaluations. Knowledge from within their mind’s eye told them just by looking at my swings that my first stroke wasn’t enough my second was too much and my third was about right for this particular 10-footer. On their part this required knowing not only how long the putt was but also how much power it required and how much power my stroke was likely to deliver. If their knowledge of all these was good they have good touch. If it was perfect knowledge they have perfect touch for that putt. But in either case even if they knew perfectly well what was needed they may or may not have the proper feel to produce that perfect stroke.

That’s touch knowing how long the putt is knowing how much power it will require to roll a ball there and knowing what stroke would provide such a roll.

Now let ‘s work on improving yours.

304 Develop Your Artistic Senses (Feel Touch Green-Reading)

Seeing (Recognizing) Distance

Felixstowe Ferry Golf Club

The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

Also my data on the percentage of putts holed from different distances shows that the PGA Tour players lead all other groups. Don’t think that you can look at the statistics quoted in the newspapers and find this information because the number that the papers publish (provided by the Tour) simply show how many putts the players average on greens hit in regulation which is affected by the quality of their iron shots (the better the iron play the shorter their putts). And these are the new putting stats. Years ago the Tour’s statistics measured putts taken per green which was influenced by how many greens players missed and how consistently they chipped close to the hole (again leaving them shorter putts). Neither of these statistics measures the quality of a player’s putting because both are strongly influenced by the quality of different shots (approaches and chips).

The true measure of the Tour pros’ putting is indicated by the percentage of putts they make (“convert”) based solely on the length of the putts (shown in Figure 1.4.1 page 7). The shaded curve is data on PGA Tour players taken between the years 1977 and 1992 and shows the spread between the best and worst conversion percentages. It has now been almost 10 years since we measured how well the pros putt and the Pelz Golf Institute is in the process of repeating this test. We hope we’ll find that the percentages have changed in recent years (they remained fairly consistent in the period from ’87 to ’92) as the conditions of greens improve and as players improve their skills (and perhaps as some of our teaching is taking effect).

If you want an answer to question 2 – “How well do you putt?” – you must measure your percentage of putts holed from each distance. You can do this but it will take some effort. You have to record the distance of each putt on your scorecard as you move around the course and indicate those you hole. After 10 to 15

Problems on the Greens 29 rounds (and at least 5 to 10 putts from each distance) you’ll begin to be able to plot your own conversion chart and compare it to those of the pros.

As for question 3 – “How good can one get at putting?” – the answer depends on a number of things: the quality of the greens how well a player reads those greens and the quality of the player’s stroke and touch. Although none of these questions can be answered definitively in this book I assure you that all of the above are getting better all the time. As greens improve putting strokes improve and golfers learn to read greens better a higher percentage of putts from every distance will be made in the future.

Finally “Flow good will your putting be in the future?” That depends on your ability to learn the mechanics of a better putting stroke your ability to learn better putting feel and touch your ability to learn to read greens better and your ability to produce the right stroke at the right time. Depending on your lifestyle your determination and intensity your focus your self-discipline and practice habits and your ability to learn only you can provide this answer.

For most golfers to improve their scores it is often easier to reduce their number of three-putts than it is to increase their number of one-putts. This is generally true for golfers with handicaps greater than 20 although it is even true for some very fine lower-handicap players. As you can see in Figure 2.9.1 the length of the most frequent first putt on greens hit from outside 60 yards is 38 feet. (This distance varies a little with the handicap of the players measured but obviously there are many more long first putts than short ones.) This figure also shows that the most frequent first putt to follow shots hit from inside 60 yards is an 18-footer. If you combine these two curves and add in all the second and third putts that become necessary after the first putt is missed you can see a typical value for the number of putts of each length golfers face per round over a season of golf (Figure 2.9.2).

Felixstowe Ferry Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Felixstowe Ferry Golf Club

Notice that the left elbow is still locked at this point. The elbow is just crossing the imaginary line that you have created between your eyes and your belly button. Remember, try to stop your elbow at this point. This is the point where your wrists will start to flip through the ball.Also notice the angle between the left arm and the club shaft is almost the same as it was at setup.

Felixstowe Ferry Golf Club