Enmore Park Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Enmore Park Golf Club

About Enmore Park Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Enmore Park Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Enmore Park Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Enmore Park Golf Club

Set within open farmland and woodland on the lower slopes of the Quantocks, Enmore Park Golf Club is a pleasant undulating parkland course which, from its high points, offers extensive views of nearby hills, across the Bristol Channel to Wales, and over the Somerset Levels to the Mendips.In addition to the challenging and satisfying golf on offer, the club has a reputation for its supporting services and hospitality – our staff are entirely focused on ensuring that our members’ visitors receive the finest service and attention.Founded in 1906 and designed by Fred Hawtree, Enmore Park Golf Club has seen many improvements over the years. With traditional roots, it has nevertheless progressed to become one of the most popular courses in the area.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

The small amount of wrist hinge each employs is done down the line so it doesn’t cause directional difficulty. When I’ve asked them about this motion they all say that their best putting days come when the stroke is more pendulum and less wrist. More proof that simplicity is the key ingredient in good putting.

The “right-hand push ” or “push stroke ” used by Jack Nicklaus has been a repeatable reliable performer for a long time. A friend once told me that Jack really wasn’t that good a player: He was just on a 30-year hot streak! Indeed Jack has putted consistently well throughout most of his career. Even today Jack’s putting remains unshakable perhaps the strongest part of his game.

Look at Figure 3.5.10 and you can see his right arm and hand arc behind the left pushing the putter through impact like a piston firing straight down the line. There is no putter rotation no forearm rotation and no wrist breakdown through the impact zone. The push stroke at its best and Jack at his best are and were almost unbeatable.

Methods of Putting 49

We are nearly at the simple end of the USGA-approved putting techniques. And it’s here that you encounter the long-putter method which is probably one option the ruling body would like to outlaw. But as long as it remains legal I suggest you give it a try (if for no other reason than to experience the feel and vision of a true pendulum motion). Because when done properly the long putter creates a wonderfully simple stroke (as demonstrated by Sam Torrance of the European Tour on the left side of Figure 3.5.1 1).

The solid shaft of the long putter eliminates any chance of wrist hinge or breakdown and minimizes the tendency to rotate the putterface with your forearms. I’ve tested thousands of students in my Scoring Game Schools and found that the majority of them make more putts of six feet or less with a long putter than when putting any other way including the conventional way. It is a very simple way to putt especially on short putts.

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

This is a point worth repeating because most golfers don’t think enough about the speed of their putts. Rather they focus on line. If you are a “line” putter try putting with a pool cue or a True Roller and I promise you’ll learn to appreciate the importance of speed in making putts.

3.3 It Gets More Difficult

So we’ve disposed of two methods that no one can or should be allowed to use. What about some techniques that have been tried and in some cases are still in use?

Croquet-Style

Next on the “easiness” scale (which means it’s a little more difficult than the techniques above) is standing so you face the putting line and putt croquet-style between your legs. Yes this really has been used. Bob Duden and Bob Shave Jr. two PGA Tour pros who had been struggling with their putting used this technique back in the 1960s. I’ve never been sure whether the USGA banned this method because it was too easy too nontraditional or it just looked bad when viewed from behind. It certainly made putting easier because it gave the golfer the best view of the line before the putt and a clear view of what the ball was doing immediately after it started to roll.

Both of these views provide critically important feedback that golfers generally miss when putting in the conventional style (that is standing to the side of the line). Croquet-style putting has other benefits: It removes all rotational motion of the forearms (which opens and closes the putterface during conventional putting) it forces the wrists to remain solid (no breakdown) and it creates the perfect in-line stroke path straight down the intended putting line.

Croquet putting is so easy that it was used by no less a legend than Sam Snead in the mid-1960s (when he was in his mid-fifties) to counter a case of the yips. Snead actually putted this way (Figure 3.3.1) – with one foot on either side of the target line – during the 1966 PGA Championship where he finished tied for sixth. Perhaps it was seeing the great Samuel Jackson Snead putt from the wrong direction or perhaps it was deemed to reduce the skill required to play the game – in any case croquet-style putting was quickly outlawed by golf’s powers that be.

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Enmore Park Golf Club

Now, you should be standing up straight, with your chest out, and your shoulders back. Your arms should be out in front of you, your elbows locked, and your wrists level with the height of your waist, while holding the club parallel to the ground. Next, bend over AT THE HIPS until the club touches the ground. Move towards or away from the ball according to where the club touches the ground. After some practice, you will be able to judge the distance well enough so that you don’t have to move around to get into position. Keep your chest out and straight while bending over at the hips. It is impossible to overstate the importance of this. You should not be bending with the back at all to reach down to the ball; you should be bending AT THE HIPS. This is one of the most common mistakes made by amateur golfers. If you look at any professional golfer on television, they will ALWAYS have a straight back, and they will ALWAYS bend at the waist to get to the ball. You will feel like your “seat” is protruding backwards more than usual. That is what we want here. Also, it’s okay if the toe of your club is not flush with the ground. It’s should be that way, especially for the long irons.

Enmore Park Golf Club