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Golf Lessons at Elstree Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

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Elstree Golf & Country Club NO JOINING FEE FREE GOLF LESSONS FOR NEW MEMBERS PAY AND PLAY WELCOME IMPROVED COURSE & CLUB HOUSE 5+7 DAY MEMBERSHIP AVAILABLE LADIES WELCOME Welcome to Elstree Golf & Country Club

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

For most golfers to improve their scores it is often easier to reduce their number of three-putts than it is to increase their number of one-putts. This is generally true for golfers with handicaps greater than 20 although it is even true for some very fine lower-handicap players. As you can see in Figure 2.9.1 the length of the most frequent first putt on greens hit from outside 60 yards is 38 feet. (This distance varies a little with the handicap of the players measured but obviously there are many more long first putts than short ones.) This figure also shows that the most frequent first putt to follow shots hit from inside 60 yards is an 18-footer. If you combine these two curves and add in all the second and third putts that become necessary after the first putt is missed you can see a typical value for the number of putts of each length golfers face per round over a season of golf (Figure 2.9.2).

Now look at the conversion curve for this group of 15- to 25-handicap golfers (Figure 2.9.3) and the frequency with which they three-putt versus the putt distance (Figure 2.9.4). By comparing these data you can see the importance of making short putts as well as learning that you can save several strokes per round by eliminating three-putts from outside 30 feet. This means that you shouldn’t practice only short putts; the long ones are also important. And you must stop three-putting those long ones if you want to be a good putter.

For those not familiar with “lag putting ” some explanations:

• To lag a putt is to minimize thoughts of holing it instead concentrating on stopping the ball as close to the proper distance and as close to the hole as possible thus minimizing the possibility of three-putting (which is first priority).

Problems on the Greens 31

Lag putters (golfers who always seem to be lagging their putts) usually leave more than half of their putts short which is not good when you are trying to hole the maximum percentage of makable putts (those inside 30 feet). But to be a good lag putter from outside 35 feet is one of putting’s

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

Technically when I refer to aim I am referring to a direction. The direction of your aim can be at a place like the edge of the hole or at an object such as a discolored piece of grass a spike mark or anything you can see and define. What you choose to aim at can be anywhere along your Aimline from just in front of the ball to alongside or even past the hole. Your aim can be one inch one ball three balls a foot or even 10 feet outside the right or left edge of the cup or it can be anywhere inside the cup. Only after you determine how much you expect your putt to break and define somewhere or something to aim at can the direction of your aim your Aimline be visualized located or marked on the green.

The track along which your putter travels is your “putter path. ” It can move straight back and straight through in-line with your Aimline it can cut across from outside-to-in or inside-to-out (shown in Figure 4.2.1) or it can loop around your Aimline. Golfers take their putters severely or slightly inside and outside their Aimlines waver along their Aimlines and sometimes incorporate a bit of all of the above into their putting paths. I believe there are almost as many distinct putter paths as there are golfers and I’m sure I haven’t seen them all.

Face Angle

A very important consideration is the putterface angle which we define as the angle between the perpendicular to your putterface and your Aimline (left side

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 59

When your face angle is pointing left of your Aimline it is closed (again for right-handed golfers). The “open” and “closed” terminology reverses for lefthanders. You must understand and remember that your putterface angle and putter path arc completely independent of each other.

Impact Point

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Elstree Golf Club

Imagine the line that has been drawn is your spine (axis). When the backswing is made, just rotate everything around that axis. If you do this properly, you will be on the correct plane. This correct swing plane will help your power, accuracy, and consistency. Keep the left arm locked as shown.

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