Elderslie Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Elderslie Golf Club

About Elderslie Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Elderslie Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Elderslie Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Elderslie Golf Club

Elderslie Golf Club was constructed in 1909 on land owned by Elderslie Estates who permitted various golf courses to be built on their extensive lands around this time.Elderslie, the birthplace of William Wallace in 1270, the course itself encompasses the Newton Woods with all it’s Wallace connections.The course is lush parkland with a large variety of trees, and follows a route from the 3rd tee to the 13th green round the woods, with ever changing views, and at the 9th green a magnificent outlook over the Clyde valley to Ben Lomond. Initially an extra 9 hole course was built for ladies and juniors, but this was taken over for grazing during the 39/45 war and never reopened. In 1924 James Braid was asked to report on the course, but he made no major recommendations and the layout today is largely unaltered from what was built in 1909, although 2 new holes were constructed on the old 9 hole course.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 79 balls in illustration) are outside his shoulders the screen-door stroke produces both a curved path around the golfer’s body and significant putterface angle rotation relative to the Aimline. This is where the in-line stroke shines as shown in the top figure: When the golfer’s hands (pendulum balls) are vertically under his shoulders his stroke path is not only naturally in-line with his Aimline his putter-face also stays square to the Aimline at all times. As you will see in section 4.8 this is an incredible advantage because the face angle is very influential in determining what line the ball starts rolling on in putting.

80 The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics

Great Putters Are Square

Do great putters rotate their putterfaces or do they keep them square through impact?

Because I have advocated the pure-in-line-square (pils) stroke for many years I have often heard from both playing and teaching professionals “But Jack Nicklaus Loren Roberts George Archer Dave Stockton and Ben Crenshaw rotate (screen-door) their putters through impact. Just look at this photograph. See you can see the putterface rotating!”

Then they show me a photo like Figure 4.7.3. Now I want to show you something. Look at the photographs in Figure 4.7.4. On the left you see Perfy my putting robot making a pure-in-line-square stroke with his hands vertically under his shoulders. In the center photograph the perpendicular gridlines show that his putterface stays perfectly square all the way down the line and the right side of the figure shows an incoming view of the same stroke (with different lines to show how perfectly on-line his stroke stays). Okay? You agree Perfy makes a pils stroke from this hands-under-shoulders (vertical pendulum) set-up?

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

So if you can’t practice with pressure how do you make practice help your putting on the golf course when it really counts? You could try to avoid pressure on the course but that’s not going to happen. The only way to putt well under pressure is to develop a stroke in practice that works both in practice and on the course when the pressure is on and your muscles are strong. I ‘m not saying you should develop a “pressure stroke ” one that’s different from the stroke you normally practice and use. What I am saying is that you should be smart enough to use your practice time to develop a normal stroke that is the same as your pressure stroke. This is a stroke that doesn’t depend on the strength of your muscles or the speed of your heartbeat. It is a stroke that will work just as well under pressure as in practice. As you’ll see below it’s called a dead-hands stroke.

The Hit Stroke

Let me explain what this “dead-hands” stroke is not. It is not your natural stroke because most golfers’ natural instinct is to “hit” a putt with the muscles of the fingers hands and wrists. Our instincts are developed in our childhood when we play games that involve hitting things turning knobs and manipulating pushing and controlling the objects in our lives with our fingers hands and wrists. This also is the way most people putt because they consider it to be natural. But just because it’s natural does not make it either the right way or the best way.

But golfers hit their putts (Figure 5.3.1). And when a ball is hit the distance it rolls depends on how hard it is hit. The power of the putt depends on the energy or effort put into the stroke. And therein lies the problem: You can’t see or feel the power of a hit before it happens. No matter how much a golfer practices hitting putts the right distance and speed when he or she gets under pressure and tries to apply the same hit to the ball with adrenaline-filled muscles the results will be wrong. Once again as the muscles get stronger the same feel that produced good results in practice produces a more powerful hit under pressure.

Many low-handicap amateurs fall into this trap. They practice with the belief that the harder and longer they work the better they’ll putt under pressure. They believe that putting well under pressure involves courage strength of conviction or some other inner quality of the heart. I suppose these character traits are admirable but they have nothing to do with how far the ball rolls in good putting. If you insist on hitting your putts and controlling your putt distance with your muscles then the only way to practice feel and touch is under pressure. The good player can accomplish this by playing in tournaments in which he is likely to face many pressure putts. Do enough of that – and enough is a lot – and you begin preparing yourself for future pressure situations. Higher-handicap golfers have a slightly different problem. Because hitting

Five Nonphysical Building Blocks: Touch Feel Attitude Routine and Ritual 117 with the hands is the natural way to putt most golfers begin by doing just that. The results won’t be very good but because the golfer is still new to the game poor putting will seem acceptable. It’s later as these golfers improve their ball-striking and short games and work on bringing their handicaps down that their natural (hand-muscle-controlled) putting stroke limits their ability to score.

The Amateurs Proved It

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Elderslie Golf Club

Wrap your right fingers lightly around the handle of the club Alternative to the interlock grip (The overlap grip)

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