Edgbaston Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Edgbaston Golf Club

About Edgbaston Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Edgbaston Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Edgbaston Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Edgbaston Golf Club

Established in 1896, we are a private members golf club with an 18 hole course designed by H. S. Colt in a unique setting just two miles from the centre of Birmingham. We are very proud of our golf club and we enjoy extending a warm welcome to Visitors and Societies by prior arrangement.The magnificent clubhouse shown opposite was originally commissioned by Sir Richard Gough in 1717.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

Once your ritual has begun there is no turning back unless you are so dis

Five Nonphysical Building Blocks: Touch Feel Attitude Routine and Ritual 129 tracted by something that you must abort the stroke altogether. And once your ritual has begun there is no thinking other than what it takes to execute the ritual and repeat the preview stroke.

I have simplified my own putting ritual since I wrote Putt Like the Pros 10 years ago. It is now slightly shorter and more repeatable taking only a five-count to execute. This means I can strike my putts within six seconds after committing to my preview stroke.

1 haven’t changed this new ritual in seven years and it’s not going to change in the future. All of my stroke mechanics have been grooved to this rhythm and I have committed them to habit. I don ‘ t have to think about the mechanics when I putt so I can concentrate on the feel and touch of my preview stroke. And if I can concentrate fully enough to create a good preview stroke (which can be difficult at times) I can putt every time with the full belief and confidence that I have made the best stroke I can. So 1 honestly feel that on most putts with any luck at all 1’11 probably make it. That’s a great feeling to have.

5.11 Creating the Best Feel for Touch

In building a putting game things must happen in order. You cannot develop good putting feel and touch if your stroke mechanics are poor. Without consistently good mechanics which transfer a consistent percentage of energy to the ball learning to roll a ball the proper speed and distance is impossible. Poor aim or a poor face angle through impact also will prevent the golfer from learning good touch. Because when a putt appears to be off-line it is so distracting that most golfers cannot hold their finish and focus on how far they rolled the ball. As a result they don’t learn anything from that putt regardless of how good or had it may have been.

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

Next on the “easiness” scale (which means it’s a little more difficult than the techniques above) is standing so you face the putting line and putt croquet-style between your legs. Yes this really has been used. Bob Duden and Bob Shave Jr. two PGA Tour pros who had been struggling with their putting used this technique back in the 1960s. I’ve never been sure whether the USGA banned this method because it was too easy too nontraditional or it just looked bad when viewed from behind. It certainly made putting easier because it gave the golfer the best view of the line before the putt and a clear view of what the ball was doing immediately after it started to roll.

Both of these views provide critically important feedback that golfers generally miss when putting in the conventional style (that is standing to the side of the line). Croquet-style putting has other benefits: It removes all rotational motion of the forearms (which opens and closes the putterface during conventional putting) it forces the wrists to remain solid (no breakdown) and it creates the perfect in-line stroke path straight down the intended putting line.

Croquet putting is so easy that it was used by no less a legend than Sam Snead in the mid-1960s (when he was in his mid-fifties) to counter a case of the yips. Snead actually putted this way (Figure 3.3.1) – with one foot on either side of the target line – during the 1966 PGA Championship where he finished tied for sixth. Perhaps it was seeing the great Samuel Jackson Snead putt from the wrong direction or perhaps it was deemed to reduce the skill required to play the game – in any case croquet-style putting was quickly outlawed by golf’s powers that be.

So Sam modified the method slightly changing to “sidesaddle” (Figure 3.3.2)

Methods of Putting 39 doing everything as much as he could the same except bringing both feet to the same side of the target line. Snead continued to putt this way until the end of his competitive career and his creation is I believe the next-easiest way to putt.

Just as with croquet-style Sam found that putting sidesaddle allowed him to bend over slightly and look down the line of his putt. But more important it still did away with the breakdown of his wrists. I’m sure golf’s grand pooh-bahs didn’t like what they saw but either they couldn’t figure out a way to outlaw the sidesaddle technique without getting sued or maybe they didn’t have the heart to drive Sam out of the game. Thank heavens they didn’t because it was wonderful watching him play the game even putting from the side for all those years.

Another Variation on a Theme

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Edgbaston Golf Club

The right elbow should remain locked to your right side throughout the backswing. As you can see, the left arm is still locked as well.This step is included for many reasons. First, it helps you swing around your spine and promotes a correct shoulder turn. It’s really hard to move your body horizontally, while keeping your right elbow locked to your side at the same time. Secondly, it prevents the “flying elbow.” The flying elbow produces everything from a slice to a wicked hook, depending on what you do with your hands in conjunction with it. So, keeping your elbow in contact with your side will help tremendously in assuring that you swing around your body, every single time. Third, it’s a power-producing move because it will put you in a position to easily flip your hands through the ball. Fourth, keeping your right elbow locked to your side will give you a great point of reference. It keeps your swing plane correct, and is a great indicator of when to stop the back swing. Finally, it helps you to “stay connected” throughout the swing. If you have your right elbow locked at your side, it will be hard to swing your arms without rotating your shoulders and visa versa.

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