East Renfrewshire Golf Club

Golf Lessons at East Renfrewshire Golf Club

About East Renfrewshire Golf Club

Golf Lessons at East Renfrewshire Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit East Renfrewshire Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

East Renfrewshire Golf Club

The East Renfrewshire Golf Club is a private members club situated 2 miles South of Newton Mearns just off the M77 at junction 5 (Maidenhill Interchange).The Club was founded in 1922 and was designed by the most famous course architect of the day James Braid. The course is a typical Braid moorland course and makes full use of the contours of the land. See the attached PDF file for Braid’s requirements for his courses. This course is a great example of these design ideas in practice.The course to-day is largely to the original Braid layout although lengthened over the years to now stand as a challenging par 70 of 6107 yards.

East Renfrewshire Golf Club

Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

These are the two specifications you should get fit first. Starting in a perfect setup position – eyes vertically above the Aimline hands vertically under the shoulders shoulder and forearm flow-lines parallel to the Aimline posture and back-to-hip angles comfortable – there is only one lie angle and one shaft length that will position the ball exactly at the sweetspot of the putter (Figure 11.6.3) while connecting the putterhead to your hands.

By the way the shaft can be a little long without hurting the overall balance. As long as you can move your hands down the grip you’re fine. But don’t let it get so long that it gets caught in your clothing especially in any rain gear or other weather wear. Unfortunately that’s a mistake most golfers don’t realize they’ve made until too late.

246 Establish Your Practice Framework

You Must Commit

So you have a putter with the lie angle and shaft length that fit your posture. And you like how it looks and feels at impact. Now before you begin an improvement program you must make a promise to yourself. You must commit to using that putter and no other for at least six months.

That’s right. I want you to stick with this putter for at least the first six months that you start working seriously on any part of your putting especially stroke mechanics. You’re going to go through a lot of changes as your brain receives the feedback from your improving knowledge and stroke and I don’t want it confused with anything that doesn’t really matter. So pick a putter get it fit (professionally is always best) and promise to stay with it through thick and thin as you learn to putt with it.

East Renfrewshire Golf Club

The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

The Hit Stroke

Let me explain what this “dead-hands” stroke is not. It is not your natural stroke because most golfers’ natural instinct is to “hit” a putt with the muscles of the fingers hands and wrists. Our instincts are developed in our childhood when we play games that involve hitting things turning knobs and manipulating pushing and controlling the objects in our lives with our fingers hands and wrists. This also is the way most people putt because they consider it to be natural. But just because it’s natural does not make it either the right way or the best way.

But golfers hit their putts (Figure 5.3.1). And when a ball is hit the distance it rolls depends on how hard it is hit. The power of the putt depends on the energy or effort put into the stroke. And therein lies the problem: You can’t see or feel the power of a hit before it happens. No matter how much a golfer practices hitting putts the right distance and speed when he or she gets under pressure and tries to apply the same hit to the ball with adrenaline-filled muscles the results will be wrong. Once again as the muscles get stronger the same feel that produced good results in practice produces a more powerful hit under pressure.

Many low-handicap amateurs fall into this trap. They practice with the belief that the harder and longer they work the better they’ll putt under pressure. They believe that putting well under pressure involves courage strength of conviction or some other inner quality of the heart. I suppose these character traits are admirable but they have nothing to do with how far the ball rolls in good putting. If you insist on hitting your putts and controlling your putt distance with your muscles then the only way to practice feel and touch is under pressure. The good player can accomplish this by playing in tournaments in which he is likely to face many pressure putts. Do enough of that – and enough is a lot – and you begin preparing yourself for future pressure situations. Higher-handicap golfers have a slightly different problem. Because hitting

Five Nonphysical Building Blocks: Touch Feel Attitude Routine and Ritual 117 with the hands is the natural way to putt most golfers begin by doing just that. The results won’t be very good but because the golfer is still new to the game poor putting will seem acceptable. It’s later as these golfers improve their ball-striking and short games and work on bringing their handicaps down that their natural (hand-muscle-controlled) putting stroke limits their ability to score.

The Amateurs Proved It

Let me give you one more problem with “hitting” your putts: It’s an inaccurate way to control the power transmitted to the ball. We measured this (Figure 5.3.2) when we tested the putting strokes of some 150 amateurs at the DuPont World Amateur tournament by measuring the length of their strokes when they putted. The averaged results show (Figure 5.3.3) that the length of their backswings varied only about 6 inches while the length of the putts produced varied from 6 to 30 feet (on a flat putting surface of 9.0 green speed). This means their backswing the power generator of the pulling stroke varied only 6 inches for 24 feet or about one-quarter inch per foot.

East Renfrewshire Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition East Renfrewshire Golf Club

Start your backswing. Focus on keeping your back straight, and your chest out. To help you swing directly around your spine, try focusing on rotating your right shoulder back and around your spine. If you focus on the right shoulder, your left shoulder will be in the correct position automatically. Simple. Keep your left elbow locked.

East Renfrewshire Golf Club