East Horton Golf Club

Golf Lessons at East Horton Golf Club

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Golf Lessons at East Horton Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit East Horton Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

East Horton Golf Club

Frequently breathtaking in its natural beauty, East Horton Golf Centre is also remarkable in another, entirely man-made way: it has been meticulously designed to optimise every golfing pleasure. All levels of experience, age and ambition are catered for, from professional to beginner, young to old, family to Association or Society.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

342 Develop Your Artistic Senses (Feel Touch Green-Reading) best stroke you can make in every situation. It can keep you willing and capable of practicing and learning to get better now and for as long as you play the game.

When you miss six eight-footers in a row (and you will) you’ll no doubt get discouraged. Most golfers do and it’s hard to blame them. They say to themselves “I might as well change my stroke because this one is not working. 1 can’t do worse than miss them all.”

But that’s not true. You can do worse: You can miss them all for the rest of your golf career. If you keep changing strokes never learning what is right or wrong about one and never fixing and committing to the one stroke that could make you a better putter you can drive yourself crazy with bad putting. So don’t do it. Don ‘t give up and start all over just because you miss a few putts; don’t throw away the good work you’ve done. Be patient and keep the faith. Lady luck can’t find your side if you don’t have one.

Even on your had days – and you’re going to have them – you need to keep the faith in your new stroke and your ability to hole putts. Because all you have to do is hole the next few and your average isn’t any worse than anyone else ‘s (or what you were doing with your old stroke). But very soon when your improved putting abilities start taking hold and your feel green-reading pure-in-line-square stroke and confidence all start paying dividends you will start to putt better. Really better. Measurably better. Lower scores better. But only if you keep on grooving and improving and polishing those building blocks of your putting game. I’ve discovered a telltale sign of a Tour pro in putting trouble. I ask “How’s your stroke? ” and he (or she) answers “Which one? “

Great putters don’t give up and change strokes every time they miss a few putts. Great putters almost make every putt even though they (like the rest of us) miss a lot more than they make. But all great putters have a stroke that they are committed to perfecting and they spend their careers working on it to make it better. I can’t think of a better example of this than Loren Roberts the “Boss of the Moss” on the PGA Tour (Figure 13.4.14). If you’ve seen him putt once you’ve seen him putt every time because that’s his stroke (it’s a great one) and will continue to he for as long as he plays.

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

For many years Harvey Penick one the game’s greatest teachers taught that the putter should swing open on the backswing and swing closed on the follow-through like a screen door as it moved around a player ‘s body (Figure 4.6.3). He believed that the natural stroke path should move to the inside on the backswing (around a motionless body) and back to the inside on the follow-through. He taught many golfers to become great players including my good friends Tom Kite and Ben Crenshaw and his screen-door concept has been the generally accepted way to putt throughout most of the 50 years I’ve been playing this game.

It was how I wanted to putt back when I thought I had a chance to have a playing career. However despite my tremendous admiration for Mr. Penick and his teaching accomplishments (which are legendary) and my own efforts to copy his opening and closing “screen-door” method my more recent research has proven that while this stroke can be effective the screen door is neither the best nor the simplest way to swing a putter.

Three Pendulums

In my first book on putting Putt Like the Pros which was published about 10 years ago I pointed out that a pure-in-line stroke path along the Aimline was the easiest most natural and best putter path to use (Figure 4.6.4). However it turns out that many golfers including some golf professionals never read or understood the concepts that determined this to be a natural motion and continue to believe and teach that the putter should swing around the body in the screen-door semicircular motion as shown in Figure 4.6.5. To understand why the in-line stroke motion is the simplest way to putt you must first understand the mechanics of the way pendulums swing. Three pendu

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 75 lums are illustrated in Figure 4.6.6. Each is swinging from a fixed point with pendulum A swinging vertically below its suspension point describing a back-andforth in-line path along a straight line. Pendulum B is swinging at a 20-degree angle to the vertical supported by a small force shown by arrow B and describing a curved path around the spot directly below its suspension point. Pendulum C is swinging at the opposite 20-degree angle supported by arrow C in a curved motion in the opposite direction around the spot below its suspension point.

All three pendulums are describing pure pendulum motions (the pendulum rhythm will be discussed in section 6.3) which occur in a gravitational field such as that found on Earth. But only pendulum A swings with gravity helping to determine its straight in-line path without any rotation or curvature of the swing path. As you can see both pendulums B and C require outside forces to keep them moving in circular motions.

Now relate these pendulums to putting strokes by attaching putters to the bottom of each pendulum. Pendulum B is what Harvey Penick prescribed: The golfer’s hands hang outside of his shoulder line (the suspension point) at some angle supported by the force B (shown by Justin Leonard in Figure 4.6.7). This puller will describe a curved path around the body like a screen door as long as no hand or arm muscles prevent it from doing so.

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition East Horton Golf Club

Position the golf ball in the manner previously described, then stand straight up. Your knees are not locked, but they are close to locked. Your back is perfectly straight. Your chest should be out. It won’t feel right to have your back straight and chest protruding. It will look and feel “exaggeratedâ€