Easingwold Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Easingwold Golf Club

About Easingwold Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Easingwold Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Easingwold Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Easingwold Golf Club

Easingwold Golf Club lies about half a mile from the charming market town of Easingwold, on the Stillington Road, looking across fields to the village of Crayke and the foothills of the North York Moors beyond. It was founded in 1930 by a small group of far-sighted and dedicated local golfers.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

8.5 The Lumpy Donut

If lots of speed/Aimline combinations roll the ball into the hole why is one better than all the rest? Why does one produce a higher percentage of putts made? Blame the greens.

The surfaces of most putting greens are not perfect. Unless you’re in the very first group of the day (and even that doesn’t guarantee perfection) the greens will be covered with footprints pitch marks from incoming shots and spike marks that can and will knock rolling balls off-line. Furthermore the edges of the hole often are worn down beat up or improperly cut. All of these imperfections get worse as the day goes on (more footprints more spike marks more pitch marks). That’s why whenever I watch a Tour event and see a player in one of the last groups make an important putt I applaud the player for both his (or her) good putting and good luck in negotiating the minefield of bad conditions between the ball and the hole.

The most influential of these imperfections without a doubt arc the footprints made by golfers near the hole. Golfers can’t help it. Most miss their first putt so they must putt a second time usually from within six feet of the hole. Then they have to get within six inches or so of the hole to retrieve their ball. As a result there is a high-density ring of footprints around every hole. But at the center of this ring is an area with no footprints at all; it’s within six inches of the hole and golfers know never to step that close. So around every hole is something that looks like a donut – a few feet of high-density footprints surrounding a raised circle one foot in diameter that is absolutely clean. Years ago I started referring to this area as the “lumpy donut” (Figure 8.5.1).

Every golfer should be aware of the lumpy donut because it can influence every putt that has a chance of finding the hole. I’ve run countless tests through the lumpy donut rolling putts at different speeds to see how they were affected. What I found was that the slower a ball rolls as it approaches the cup the more

Speed Is More Important Than Line 189 often and more severely it is deflected to one side or the other and misses the hole. On the other hand the faster a putt rolls the more likely it will maintain its line to hit the cup but the more likely it will lip out due to excessive speed. What does this mean to you? If you like to die your putts at the hole understand that the lumpy donut significantly lessens your chance of holing the first putt. If you prefer jamming putts at the hole to minimize the break realize that the extra speed you are adding can negatively affect the chances of your putt staying in the hole (if you take it too far). Figure 8.5.2 shows the middle ground between these two extremes the dependence of the “make” percentage on speed.

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

4.2 Stroke Definitions

Where are you aiming? Sooner or later 1 ask that question of every golfer I work with. Aim is a critical aspect of putting (more on that later) and both you and I need to know not only where you are trying to aim (where you think you are aiming) but also where you are actually aiming your putter your stance and your stroke.

Technically when I refer to aim I am referring to a direction. The direction of your aim can be at a place like the edge of the hole or at an object such as a discolored piece of grass a spike mark or anything you can see and define. What you choose to aim at can be anywhere along your Aimline from just in front of the ball to alongside or even past the hole. Your aim can be one inch one ball three balls a foot or even 10 feet outside the right or left edge of the cup or it can be anywhere inside the cup. Only after you determine how much you expect your putt to break and define somewhere or something to aim at can the direction of your aim your Aimline be visualized located or marked on the green.

The track along which your putter travels is your “putter path. ” It can move straight back and straight through in-line with your Aimline it can cut across from outside-to-in or inside-to-out (shown in Figure 4.2.1) or it can loop around your Aimline. Golfers take their putters severely or slightly inside and outside their Aimlines waver along their Aimlines and sometimes incorporate a bit of all of the above into their putting paths. I believe there are almost as many distinct putter paths as there are golfers and I’m sure I haven’t seen them all.

Face Angle

A very important consideration is the putterface angle which we define as the angle between the perpendicular to your putterface and your Aimline (left side

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 59

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Easingwold Golf Club

Notice that the right elbow becomes locked now as the right arm continues to swing. As you can see the right wrist has started to roll on top of the left wrist. The left elbow is now closer to the body, and is able to bend. The left elbow cannot be completely stopped at the imaginary line, but just a hesitation is enough to let your hands swing through the ball. Notice that the triangle is still present.

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