Dyke Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Dyke Golf Club

About Dyke Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Dyke Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Dyke Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Dyke Golf Club

The Dyke Golf Club is situated only 4 miles from the centre of Brighton and is easily reached from the A23 and A27 and all major routes to Brighton. We are also 4 miles from the mainline railway station. We are one of the premier downland courses in Sussex and one of the oldest in the area, having been founded in 1906. The present course, which was rebuilt after World War II, is modern and provides a good challenge for all levels of player.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

If you mis-hit these putts on the downhill side of your putter sweetspot you deserve to miss the putts!

Face Your Special Problems 357

Don’t ever try to “cheat” this way – toward the heel or toe – on putts longer than 10 feet because mis-hitting reduces the energy too much for putts of that length and they’ll all finish short. Always hit longer putts as solidly as you can even if they have a substantial amount of break so they at least have a chance of getting to (and going in) the hole.

14.7 You Lost It

You ‘ve missed six putts in a row from inside five feet and four of them were fourfooters. You’re normally good at putts of that length. Plus you felt good over all of them and thought you stroked them well.

Then it happens again the next day. And again the following week. You used to be a good putter but suddenly you seem to have lost it completely. What happened? Why is this happening (Figure 14.7.1)?

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

Once you know how much gas you need then you have to figure out how hard to step on the gas pedal and when to step on the brakes as you drive on your Thanksgiving trip (something you figure out after you are into the trip) to negotiate the stops and turns in the road along the way. This “knowing how to drive” is analogous to knowing how to feel the proper stroke in putting where you must know in your mind’s eye the required size of the swing (or hardness of the hit) as well as how it will look and feel to impart the power which will provide the proper energy and speed of roll required. So touch is knowing how long the trip is and how much power it will require and feel is knowing how to apply the power (how to drive) to get you there.

Of course good touch and feel also require a proper read of the green knowing what will happen to your putt as it rolls. Think of green-reading as having a good road map for your journey. A good map or good directions can make the trip easy but a bad map with poor directions can turn the simplest trip into a nightmare.

So you need a map enough gas and the knowledge of how hard to step on the gas pedal along the way. You need all these things in concert to have a good trip. And you need good feel touch and green-reading skills also working together to putt well. Leave one out or do one poorly and it will he the same as losing your way on your Thanksgiving trip. Feel touch and green-reading are separate skills essentially different in nature yet each needs to be developed to provide the best result. And in case I ‘ve confused you that result is to roll the ball into the hole.

5.2 Touch and Feel Are in the Mind’s Eye

The skill bases for your touch and feel (green-reading will be discussed in Chapter 7) are intermingled in your mind. They are also intermingled in that they have a combined effect on putting results. But each is a separate skill which can be learned and developed over time.

Touch is in your head but it begins with knowing what your putt looks like and remembering (knowing based on past experience) how much power (the size or intensity of stroke) was required in the past for similar putts. Touch is an acquired skill based on past experiences. It resides in your memory bank and plays a part in creating the mind’s-eye picture of the size of stroke you need.

Before you can develop a good feel for a putt you need to have a good idea for how long it is and how much power will be required to roll it the proper speed and distance: In other words you need to have touch. Given that feel for the putt involves having a good idea of how to apply the power which will be needed to roll the ball at the optimum speed along that line to allow it to break into the hole. Having good feel for a putt is having the idea or picture in your mind’s eye of how the stroke will look and feel in both rhythm and intensity as it rolls the ball to the hole. So a part of feel is in your head. Feel also involves a kinesthetic awareness for the violence (or nonviolence) of your swing and knowing the physical sensation to expect at impact including the vibrations that will travel up the shaft after the putter strikes the ball. It is based on the feel of your collected experience from thousands of swings you’ve made on previous putts and the results they produced. This feel is produced in your nerve endings fingers arms and shoulders in the muscles of all of these entities as well as in your brain and memory.

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Dyke Golf Club

Notice that the left elbow is still locked at this point. The elbow is just crossing the imaginary line that you have created between your eyes and your belly button. Remember, try to stop your elbow at this point. This is the point where your wrists will start to flip through the ball.Also notice the angle between the left arm and the club shaft is almost the same as it was at setup.

Dyke Golf Club