Dunkeld Birnam Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Dunkeld & Birnam Golf Club

About Dunkeld & Birnam Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Dunkeld & Birnam Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Dunkeld & Birnam Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Dunkeld & Birnam Golf Club

The course is one of the most picturesque in Perthshire with each hole affording not only a new and interesting challenge for the golfer, but also ever changing views of the glorious surrounding countryside. You are guaranteed a friendly welcome, warm hospitality and an enjoyable round of golf at Dunkeld and Birnam. Catering, bar facilities, buggies, trolley and club hire available.

Dunkeld & Birnam Golf Club

Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

Every golfer has problems. Even the best of them the most talented the greatest ball-strikers the game has ever known have problems with their putting. For example Tom Purtzer and Hal Sutton are two of the best ball-strikers I’ve ever seen (Figure 14.1.1). Gifted athletes yet both often aim their flow-lines way to the left and both have struggled with their putting because of it. Or look at Craig

Face Your Special Problems 345

Stadler a wonderful player now as he has been for many years (Figure 14.1.2). But he sometimes moves his upper body so much during his stroke that he almost can’t find the ball let alone the hole when he putts. Some golfers make way fewer than the average number of 10- to 20-footers while others struggle with short putts. Some can’t make left-to-right-breaking putts and many golfers can’t get the ball to consistently reach the hole. However it’s interesting that few great golfers have trouble lagging their putts close to the hole. I’d say that’s because lag putting isn’t all that difficult (as I discussed in Chapter 13). his wrists to the extreme. His putting has suffered from it too.

Tom Watson Greg Norman David Duval and Tiger Woods may be the best players since Jack Nicklaus but they all have room for improvement in their putting games: Watson has had trouble making the short ones consistently; Norman sometimes loses his tempo becomes too deliberate and his conversion of 6-to 12-footers suffers as a result; Duval occasionally rushes and pushes too many putts; and Tiger keeps trying to keep putts from breaking and blows too many short ones past the hole causing too many lip-outs. Watch the pros and you’ll see that all of them are constantly working on their putting. But they have a lot more to lose than they have to gain when they work on any part of their game so they must be especially careful to pick the right part (building block) of their putting game to work on. Then they must improve in a way that benefits their putting game and allows their improved putting game to fit into their whole game without causing any other problems elsewhere.

My point is that while every golfer has putting problems every one of these problems is fixable. Poor golfers can putt better average golfers can learn to putt great and

346 Face Your Special Problems great putters can putt great even more consistently. (And yes poor putters can learn to putt great but it comes in stages: First they must putt better then good then really good then almost great and finally great.) Look at the change Hal Sutton has made in the position of his left wrist through impact (Figure 14.1.3). For a while Hal was breaking down badly and his putting was miserable for a few years. But he worked through it and was one of the stalwarts for the U.S. team in their 1999 Ryder Cup victory after having a great year in ’99 while putting like a magician.

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

104 The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics

Opening or closing your stance by moving your feet off the flow-line is accept able but not recommended. Because your stance can affect your shoulder align ment and the line of your shoulders is vital to good putting I normally recom mend setting the feet square. Of course it is possible to move your feet open or closed without moving your shoulders. Just be sure your shoulder flow-line re mains parallel-left to your Aimline.

My measurements also show that many of the world’s best putters create a stable lower body by placing slightly more than half – 55 to 60 percent – of their weight on their forward foot.

Elbows

Something else to watch out for in your putting stroke motion is any change in your elbow angles. I am told that early in the career of Arnold Palmer his father

Deacon told him the secret to putting was to keep his putter low going back and low coming through. However the only way you can keep the club low to the ground is to extend and contract your elbows: Extend them during your back- swing contract them as you swing through impact then extend them again on your follow-through. I believe this complex set of motions – plus a propensity to power his putts with a wrist hinge – is what destroyed Arnold’s putting in the latter portion of his career.

I don’t mean to criticize Arnold or Deacon Palmer because Arnold putted well enough to be one of the best players of all time. But I’m convinced that with his fantastic imagination talent and competitive instincts (he certainly never had the best golf swing) he would have been even more dominant and for a longer time if he had used a simpler putting stroke and been a better putter.

Dunkeld & Birnam Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Dunkeld & Birnam Golf Club

This is the final setup position. The back is still straight. All you need to do is bend at the waist until the club touches the ground. As you can see, the arms are still stretched out, and the hands are hanging straight down from the shoulders. They seem lower than waist-level, but the relationship between the arms and chest has not changed. Your legs remain in a fixed position, while you move the arms and chest together to the ball. This is the key to a good, simple setup.

Dunkeld & Birnam Golf Club