Dunham Forest Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Dunham Forest Golf Club

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Golf Lessons at Dunham Forest Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

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Dunham Forest Golf Club

This stunning 18 hole championship course was designed by John Bealey and modified by ex-Ryder Cup player and top international course designer Dave Thomas to follow the picturesque contours of the natural landscape you would expect in Cheshire. He achieved this so successfully that today the Club is proud to be considered one of the most beautiful in the North West of the UK.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

I will devote the remainder of this chapter to showing you first how to see how much putts truly break – that is how to react greens (predict how much putts will truly break). Then 1 will show you how to groove a noncompensating stroke that will start your putts on your Aim line without subconscious compensations. This noncompensating stroke will be the one stroke that works for all your putts from here on out. It will make your putting game simpler and more effective than ever before.

Recognize Green Speed and Slope

Before you can predict how much a putt will break you must recognize the slope of the green and how fast the ball will roll on it. Back in Chapter 7 1 told you that the more a green slopes the more a putt will break. And the faster the green (the lower its surface friction) the slower you must roll a putt and again the more it will break. So it stands to reason that the better you recognize slopes and green speeds the better you will recognize how much putts will break.

First I’ll deal with green speed (Figure 13.4.3). If you can become proficient at knowing how fast greens are you can imagine how fast the ball is going to roll. Without this there is no way to predict how much it is going to break. There are three ways to learn green speeds: (1) measure them exactly; (2) measure them approximately; and (3) observe other golfers’ results over time.

Develop Your Artistic Senses (Feel Touch Green-Reading) 329 inch backswing strokes discussed in section 12.2) on the practice green before you play each round. Make it a habit to roll three balls on a flat part of the putting green one with each reference stroke. Then roll them in the opposite direction to average out any slope or grain effects. Over time you’ll learn what to expect while each day you’ll get a visual judgment of how the greens are rolling. The accuracy of this method depends on the consistency of your reference strokes; therefore this method will never be as accurate as learning the green-speed scale from the superintendent.

3. As usual the easiest way to do something provides the least satisfying results. You can try to get a feel for green speed by watching other golfers putt noticing how much speed their putts seem to have as they roll versus the way the greens look. This is better than being oblivious to green speed but there’s no point of reference and at best it gives you only an approximation of the speed you’ll be dealing with on any given day.

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

My point is great putters have their putterfaces square to their Aimlines through impact what you see in photographs on TV or in person notwithstanding. That’s one of the reasons they putt so well. If the camera is not on-line or if gridlines aren’t present to reference your vision you can’t believe what you see because of the optical illusions. Even standing face-on watching a player putt at a tournament your eyes (and those of playing and teaching pros) deceive you in the same way. You’ve got to get your eyes (or the camera) either on-line or vertically above a swing motion to see if it’s on-line and rotating or not (as in Figure 4.7.2 where you can accurately compare the rotation of screen-door vs. pits stroke motions).

82 The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics it’s important to realize that the putter shaft is not the pendulum of the stroke and the lie of the putter shaft does not affect the path of your stroke unless it makes you move your hands. Figure 4.7.6 shows the path of a vertical pendulum stroke with two different putters with different shaft angles: You can see that both swing in a pure-in-line-square motion all the way.

Everyone Can Swing On-Line and Square

Away from physics and hack to golf. As long as your putting triangle (Figure 4.7.7) remains intact so the elbow and wrist angles don’t change during the stroke and your forearms don’t rotate there is a position of your hands somewhere under your shoulders that will produce a pure-in-line-square stroke. This stroke is perfectly natural with no involvement of the muscles of your hands wrists or forearms. This lack of hand action is what we call a “dead-hands” stroke. (Note: The perfect vertical pendulum hand position can be influenced by the musculature of your shoulders and arms. Golfers with either very muscular or slender arms may find the spot isn’t precisely under their shoulders – but pretty close – due to the weight balance of the arms hands and putter.)

You’ve now had it proven that it is not only possible but also natural to swing your putter in a pure straight-line motion without any hand or forearm manipulations. And it’s equally possible and natural to swing your putter around or away from your body. Which stroke do you think lets you putt best? To me it’s obvious that the pure-in-line-square (pils) stroke is the simplest and best way to putt.

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 83

It’s Natural

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Dunham Forest Golf Club

The chest and shoulders shouldn’t be turning, unless your arms are turning with them. In other words, you want to start your swing with a shoulder turn, but your arms should start swinging at EXACTLY the same time. They are an extension. They are connected. Furthermore, your arms shouldn’t be swinging unless your chest is rotating. Don’t start swinging your arms without starting the shoulder turn. They are connected. Your left elbow remains locked throughout the entire swing. When you complete your shoulder turn, your arms should stop as well. The goal will be to have your left arm exactly parallel to the ground. Your elbow is still locked. When it gets there…STOP. Do not continue to swing your arms.

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