Driffield Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Driffield Golf Club

About Driffield Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Driffield Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Driffield Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Driffield Golf Club

Driffield Golf Club lies just south of the town and is easily accessible from Hull, Beverley, York and the coastal resorts of East Yorkshire. The course is in a tranquil setting surrounded by the farmland of the Sunderlandwick estate of which it is a part. The natural features of the course play host to a wide variety of wildlife and the trout stream which runs through the course is a particular feature.The easy walking course presents a true challenge for the golfer, with tree lined fairways, streams and ponds all demanding accuracy. Driffield is a popular venue and hosts both East Riding and Yorkshire Union events.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

292 Improve Your Stroke Mechanics

Some Are Slower Than Others

Don ‘ t gel discouraged if it takes you some time to improve with any of the face-angle drills discussed so far. Remember all golfers including you have developed compensations for setup and aim errors forearm rotation loopy paths and other mistakes. But of all the setup aim path and flow-line errors I’ve been discussing in this and the previous chapter face-angle error compensations take the longest to correct. And for that you can blame your subconscious which has been controlling your face angle since you first picked up a putter. Your subconscious is accustomed to doing whatever it takes to get your putts to go toward the hole but we’re now Telling it to do nothing and as I said early on the subconscious can be very powerful and very stubborn. So these drills can take some time to take hold.

Be patient and let your subconscious come along at its own pace. If you use some or all of the face-angle learning devices I’ve mentioned in this chapter you will quickly become accustomed to practicing with feedback. And when you see how much feedback helps you may wonder why you were wasting your time in the past practicing on a putting green without really knowing what was wrong or how to fix it. By seeing and internalizing feedback as you practice you are moving toward a wonderful place – being able to practice all parts of your putting game with feedback and depending on improving from it.

A Great Practice Session

Perfect practice is an ideal not a goal because it is impossible to attain. But great practice is possible even probable. You have seen several aspects of it above as you learned how to work on the various building blocks of your putting game. Put them together and you can have a great practice session.

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

Methods of Putting 47 “block-strokes” better than Lee Trevino.

Every part of Lee’s game is built on aiming to the left then blocking his swing through impact so it’s little surprise he does this when putting too. In my opinion Trevino is another great player who achieved greatness in spite of his putting not because of it. And he agrees: Lee told me that if he had putted as well as Jack Nicklaus you might never have heard of the Golden Bear.

I believe him. He has always been a great ball-striker (the best I ever measured) and he putted reasonably well but never great. He is a very talented player who did well with a somewhat complex putting stroke. But he would have putted better and won more with a better (which to me means simpler) putting stroke.

Next on my list of strokes (still moving toward simplicity) is the “blend” stroke a combination of the power stroke and a pure pendulum stroke usually employing a slight wrist hinge. A number of fine players putt this way including Brad Faxon Lee Janzen D. A. Weibring and Ben Crenshaw (Figure 3.5.9). Every one of these players is a wonderful putter and every one uses a predominantly pendulum motion with just a little bit of power provided by the hand muscles.

The small amount of wrist hinge each employs is done down the line so it doesn’t cause directional difficulty. When I’ve asked them about this motion they all say that their best putting days come when the stroke is more pendulum and less wrist. More proof that simplicity is the key ingredient in good putting.

The “right-hand push ” or “push stroke ” used by Jack Nicklaus has been a repeatable reliable performer for a long time. A friend once told me that Jack really wasn’t that good a player: He was just on a 30-year hot streak! Indeed Jack has putted consistently well throughout most of his career. Even today Jack’s putting remains unshakable perhaps the strongest part of his game.

Look at Figure 3.5.10 and you can see his right arm and hand arc behind the left pushing the putter through impact like a piston firing straight down the line. There is no putter rotation no forearm rotation and no wrist breakdown through the impact zone. The push stroke at its best and Jack at his best are and were almost unbeatable.

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Driffield Golf Club

Keep focusing on bringing your right shoulder back and around your spine. Some of you may be able to turn about 90 degrees around your spine as shown in the picture on the left. Others may only be able to turn 45 degrees around your spine. Either is okay, but do not start moving other parts of the body to compensate for not being able to make a full shoulder turn. Stop when it gets uncomfortable. The important part is to STAY CONNECTED. When your left arm becomes parallel to the ground, stop your swing.

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