Donnington Valley Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Donnington Valley Golf Club

About Donnington Valley Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Donnington Valley Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Donnington Valley Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Donnington Valley Golf Club

Welcome to Donnington Valley Golf Club, the friendliest golf club in the area.Owned by Sir Peter Michael, Donnington Valley Golf Club is the sister company of the 4-star Donnington Valley Hotel and Spa , The Vineyard at Stockcross, and The Vineyard Cellars, a supplier of Fine Californian Wines. All of which collectively make up The Peter Michael Collection.The Course, re-designed and lengthened between 1998 and 2000, is set in beautiful rolling countryside, and is now a challenging 6353 yards, 18 hole, par 71 from the back tees. Although some of the holes are quite forgiving the closing four holes are regarded as one of the toughest finishes in the country, with water featuring prominently on 15th, 16th and 17th holes.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

Start with the track set up to provide one inch of total space (roughly half an inch on each side) between your putter and the side rails and count how many of your strokes make noise by hitting the sides of the track. You want to set this space tolerance so you hit a rail on about 50 percent of your strokes as that percentage is perfect for rapid learning from maximum feedback. You may have to adjust the rails for more or less space to achieve this level of performance (Figure 12.1.4). Practice about 10 minutes (about 50 putts) each session multiple sessions ea&

Improve Your Stroke Mechanics 273 day if you want until 80 percent of your strokes are quiet. Then it’s time to tighten the tolerance to the half-noise half-quiet level again.

Before you start each Putting Track session set your metronome to your body-rhythm tempo and prepare yourself to optimize your address posture and flowline positions as best you can. Assume your practice swing stance just outside the track (like your practice stance four inches left of your real putts on the green) and make a preview stroke of the putt you are going to practice. Then move into your setup in the track (use tape to mark your perfect toe-to-ball distance) and execute your ritual before every putt. If you do all this you’re not only improving your stroke path you’re committing your setup ritual and rhythm as well as your stroke path to subconscious control (and habit) at the same time.

Don’t be surprised if your first few practice sessions seem both physically and mentally taxing. You ‘ve probably never received so much feedback on your stroke before and your subconscious may not be accustomed to working this hard. But this is exactly what you want so keep it up. After a few sessions you’ll begin to feel relaxed and see real improvement. That’s when you’re ready to add a few more feedback devices to the mix.

By adding Elk’s Key (it should fit under the track without any adjustment) you optimize your shoulder flow-line learning (Figure 12.1.5). This is also a good time to start holding your follow-through position at the end of each stroke for five seconds (this habit will pay big benefits in later outdoor practice sessions).

The final addition to your Putting Track practice sessions is to work on making a pure-in-line-square down-the-Aimline stroke on breaking putts. Don’t do this right

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

Let me explain what this “dead-hands” stroke is not. It is not your natural stroke because most golfers’ natural instinct is to “hit” a putt with the muscles of the fingers hands and wrists. Our instincts are developed in our childhood when we play games that involve hitting things turning knobs and manipulating pushing and controlling the objects in our lives with our fingers hands and wrists. This also is the way most people putt because they consider it to be natural. But just because it’s natural does not make it either the right way or the best way.

But golfers hit their putts (Figure 5.3.1). And when a ball is hit the distance it rolls depends on how hard it is hit. The power of the putt depends on the energy or effort put into the stroke. And therein lies the problem: You can’t see or feel the power of a hit before it happens. No matter how much a golfer practices hitting putts the right distance and speed when he or she gets under pressure and tries to apply the same hit to the ball with adrenaline-filled muscles the results will be wrong. Once again as the muscles get stronger the same feel that produced good results in practice produces a more powerful hit under pressure.

Many low-handicap amateurs fall into this trap. They practice with the belief that the harder and longer they work the better they’ll putt under pressure. They believe that putting well under pressure involves courage strength of conviction or some other inner quality of the heart. I suppose these character traits are admirable but they have nothing to do with how far the ball rolls in good putting. If you insist on hitting your putts and controlling your putt distance with your muscles then the only way to practice feel and touch is under pressure. The good player can accomplish this by playing in tournaments in which he is likely to face many pressure putts. Do enough of that – and enough is a lot – and you begin preparing yourself for future pressure situations. Higher-handicap golfers have a slightly different problem. Because hitting

Five Nonphysical Building Blocks: Touch Feel Attitude Routine and Ritual 117 with the hands is the natural way to putt most golfers begin by doing just that. The results won’t be very good but because the golfer is still new to the game poor putting will seem acceptable. It’s later as these golfers improve their ball-striking and short games and work on bringing their handicaps down that their natural (hand-muscle-controlled) putting stroke limits their ability to score.

The Amateurs Proved It

Let me give you one more problem with “hitting” your putts: It’s an inaccurate way to control the power transmitted to the ball. We measured this (Figure 5.3.2) when we tested the putting strokes of some 150 amateurs at the DuPont World Amateur tournament by measuring the length of their strokes when they putted. The averaged results show (Figure 5.3.3) that the length of their backswings varied only about 6 inches while the length of the putts produced varied from 6 to 30 feet (on a flat putting surface of 9.0 green speed). This means their backswing the power generator of the pulling stroke varied only 6 inches for 24 feet or about one-quarter inch per foot.

Think of the pressure that puts on every pull. These amateurs must be able to sense and feel a difference of less than one inch – between a 9- and 9 3/4-inch backswing – to produce putts of 12 and 15 feet respectively. And that’s not all. They also have to accurately feel the differences in the strength of the hits that produce these two putts of different lengths. As these examples prove there is not much margin for error when you’re trying to control the distance your putts roll with a hit. There is a better way.

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Donnington Valley Golf Club

The follow through is now complete. The forearms are completely crossed, showing that you have gotten your hands through the ball. It may take a few days to get used to this new “left elbow close-to-side, forearms crossed-at-finish” concept. It will come though. It’s one of the best things you can do for your golf swing. No more blocking to the right or uncontrollably slicing the ball!

Donnington Valley Golf Club