Dirleton Castle Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Dirleton Castle Golf Club

About Dirleton Castle Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Dirleton Castle Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Dirleton Castle Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

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GULLANE is a small village with a population of 1,800, surrounded by five outstanding links courses including Muirfield one of the most famous in the world. The buildings in this district give the impression of recent times, yet Gullane as a village is very old. The ruined church at the roadside, adjacent to the professional’s shop, was dedicated to St Andrew in the 12th century. The last vicar of ‘Golyn’ Andro Makghe was deposed by James VI for smoking tobacco.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

Another unusual – I wouldn’t go so far as to call it unique – putting style was put to good use for many years by Billy Casper. He locked his arms against his stomach and powered his putts purely by hinging his wrists (Figure 3.5.7). Once again Casper no longer uses this method and steers others away from it saying that it took far more time patience and practice to keep sharp than the pendulum stroke that is now popular among Tour pros.

However in his behalf I have to say that Billy won a lot of tournaments putting with his wrists so you know it can be done. I caution you though that you will have to devote yourself to hours and hours of practice for years and years and also play under enough pressure to learn how to handle the effects of adrenaline the way he did.

The Block Stroke Here’s a method that sounds almost ridiculous: Aim the putterface a foot to the left of your target on a straight putt then block the ball toward the hole. That’s what Lee Trevino has done throughout his career (Figure 3.5.8).

Methods of Putting 47 “block-strokes” better than Lee Trevino.

Every part of Lee’s game is built on aiming to the left then blocking his swing through impact so it’s little surprise he does this when putting too. In my opinion Trevino is another great player who achieved greatness in spite of his putting not because of it. And he agrees: Lee told me that if he had putted as well as Jack Nicklaus you might never have heard of the Golden Bear.

I believe him. He has always been a great ball-striker (the best I ever measured) and he putted reasonably well but never great. He is a very talented player who did well with a somewhat complex putting stroke. But he would have putted better and won more with a better (which to me means simpler) putting stroke.

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

If you want an answer to question 2 – “How well do you putt?” – you must measure your percentage of putts holed from each distance. You can do this but it will take some effort. You have to record the distance of each putt on your scorecard as you move around the course and indicate those you hole. After 10 to 15

Problems on the Greens 29 rounds (and at least 5 to 10 putts from each distance) you’ll begin to be able to plot your own conversion chart and compare it to those of the pros.

As for question 3 – “How good can one get at putting?” – the answer depends on a number of things: the quality of the greens how well a player reads those greens and the quality of the player’s stroke and touch. Although none of these questions can be answered definitively in this book I assure you that all of the above are getting better all the time. As greens improve putting strokes improve and golfers learn to read greens better a higher percentage of putts from every distance will be made in the future.

Finally “Flow good will your putting be in the future?” That depends on your ability to learn the mechanics of a better putting stroke your ability to learn better putting feel and touch your ability to learn to read greens better and your ability to produce the right stroke at the right time. Depending on your lifestyle your determination and intensity your focus your self-discipline and practice habits and your ability to learn only you can provide this answer.

For most golfers to improve their scores it is often easier to reduce their number of three-putts than it is to increase their number of one-putts. This is generally true for golfers with handicaps greater than 20 although it is even true for some very fine lower-handicap players. As you can see in Figure 2.9.1 the length of the most frequent first putt on greens hit from outside 60 yards is 38 feet. (This distance varies a little with the handicap of the players measured but obviously there are many more long first putts than short ones.) This figure also shows that the most frequent first putt to follow shots hit from inside 60 yards is an 18-footer. If you combine these two curves and add in all the second and third putts that become necessary after the first putt is missed you can see a typical value for the number of putts of each length golfers face per round over a season of golf (Figure 2.9.2).

Now look at the conversion curve for this group of 15- to 25-handicap golfers (Figure 2.9.3) and the frequency with which they three-putt versus the putt distance (Figure 2.9.4). By comparing these data you can see the importance of making short putts as well as learning that you can save several strokes per round by eliminating three-putts from outside 30 feet. This means that you shouldn’t practice only short putts; the long ones are also important. And you must stop three-putting those long ones if you want to be a good putter.

For those not familiar with “lag putting ” some explanations:

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Dirleton Castle Golf Club

Please start with the three pictures below. Understand that the point of these pictures is to get your arms and chest connected. You should understand the feeling of “being connected” before you try to incorporate this critical step into your golf swing. If you hold the club straight out in front of you, there will be a triangle formed between your arms and chest. Just focus on keeping the triangle between your arms and chest fixed. Just move your arms with your chest. When your chest stops rotating, your arms also stop. Please see the three pictures below and try it out. Turn to your right, then back around to your left, keeping the triangle between your arms and chest constant at all times.

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