Deanwood Park Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Deanwood Park Golf Club

About Deanwood Park Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Deanwood Park Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Deanwood Park Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Deanwood Park Golf Club

Deanwood Park Golf Club, a treasure in England’s most beautiful county: Royal Berkshire, with rolling downs, tranquil rivers and friendly people. Our lovely course is situated only two miles from historic Newbury. The golf course is situated 500 yds along the Lambourn Rd (B4000) from its junction with the A4 (A34 by-pass roundabout) Newbury to Hungerford Road. Junction 13 of the M4 is only 2 miles north on the A34.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

Just as with croquet-style Sam found that putting sidesaddle allowed him to bend over slightly and look down the line of his putt. But more important it still did away with the breakdown of his wrists. I’m sure golf’s grand pooh-bahs didn’t like what they saw but either they couldn’t figure out a way to outlaw the sidesaddle technique without getting sued or maybe they didn’t have the heart to drive Sam out of the game. Thank heavens they didn’t because it was wonderful watching him play the game even putting from the side for all those years.

Another Variation on a Theme

Someone else started with Snead’s sidesaddle style and made a modification of his own which produced the best putting I’ve seen to this day. Rather than using a standard-length (roughly 35-inch) putter a fellow came to me putting sidesaddle but with a longer-than-normal (about 42-inch) putter (Figure 3.3.3). He stood beside the putting line facing the hole and swung the putter along a perfect vertical pendulum with his top hand and the top of the putter tucked under his armpit. He leaned over to set his eyes directly over the putting line then balanced his weight by extending one foot away from the line.

I can’t remember the name of the man who figured this out but I give him credit: He found something that really does work. He started every putt by standing directly behind the ball and pointed from his ball to a spot out in front of it on his intended starting line. Then he addressed the ball and again pointed down the line to make sure he was aligned correctly. Finally he stroked the ball and held his finish pointing at the same spot again exactly down the putt starting line.

This technique produced the consistently best putting I’ve ever seen and it is legal. But I’m certain that if someone switches to this style and starts winning with it the USGA probably will ban it.

One of the tenets of the USGA the ruling body of golf is to protect and maintain the integrity of the game in part by preserving its challenge and difficulty. I support this noble purpose and think most golfers feel the same way. If we lost the challenge in the game it wouldn’t be nearly so much fun. Having said that we all want to make our own putting strokes simpler so we can hole more putts score better and enjoy the game to its fullest.

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

Green speed always affects a putt’s speed and direction of roll (except on dead flat greens where direction is straight no matter what the speed). And the combination of green speed the amount of energy transferred to a putt and the influence of contours and slopes on the greens determines the results of your putts based on how much the putt truly breaks your putt’s initial Aimline and starting speed.

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics

Seven of the 15 building blocks of putting deal with stroke mechanics. By the end of this chapter you should understand them and how they affect your ability to putt. These seven fundamentals (Figure 4.4.1) have the most to do with determining the quality of a putting stroke and its results. They are not the only mechanical factors but they are the primary ones and the ones we are most concerned with in our schools. They are your aim power source putter path putterface angle impact point flow lines and putter fitting. If you understand and improve these seven fundamentals you will roll better putts. If you also can understand how to read greens better and learn to have better putting feel and touch then there is no question but that you will also make more putts.

It is a fact proven by testing that the better you aim the better you putt. That’s why I say aim is the first fundamental of putting stroke mechanics. Most golfers aim very poorly which is significant because aim can have a direct impact on all the other fundamentals: If you aim poorly something else in your stroke must compensate to correct for the error.

Aim Is Learned

Aiming is easy. Everybody aims. It is aiming precisely where you want to aim that is more elusive. The fact that most golfers do a poor job of aiming is not surprising because there’s no feedback on a putting green to teach golfers how to aim properly. In the absence of feedback golfers use two inputs to guide their attempts to aim: First they use their previous putting results (what I call reaction aiming) and second they use the look of their putter relative to their Aimline (what I call position aiming). Further explanations are in order.

Reaction Aiming

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

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First of all, it’s important that you realize that your grip will affect the results that you get. However, it’s not as complicated as the other systems make it out to be. First, grab the club with your right hand so the face of it is toward the target. Keep the face pointed toward the target, while placing your left hand on the bottom of the grip or handle. At this point you should be holding your left hand out flat, so that it is touching the bottom of the grip. Position the joint where your left pinky meets your palm directly underneath the handle of the club. Keep the pinky there and place the first joint in your left forefinger directly underneath the club. Now, do not lift your fingers up, bringing the grip of the club into your palm; instead, hold the handle steady with your left fingers and wrap your palm around the top of the grip. This is an important distinction. Again, don’t wrap the fingers towards the palm, but instead wrap your palm around the top of the club. Now, you should be able to easily place your left thumb directly on top of the club. This should form a V-shape where your left thumb and left forefinger meet. This V-shape should point directly to your right shoulder when it’s complete.

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