Darwen Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Darwen Golf Club

About Darwen Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Darwen Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Darwen Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Darwen Golf Club

Formed in 1893 by a local vicar Darwen Golf Club has grown steadily in size and reputation over the last century. Built on undulating moorland, it is a very challenging eighteen hole course that measures 6354 yards, and has over recent years added many new features . With breath taking views over The Fylde Coast, Lake District and North Wales this challenging course will appeal to every type of golfer.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

As explained back in Chapter 5 putting routine and putting ritual are two different things. The routine is creating all the information and getting comfortable with the stroke. The ritual is the “get ready get set go” that creates the rhythm and cadence of your backswing and follow-through. Your ritual is actually the first part of your stroke. It is a series of physical motions – made in your natural body rhythm – that immediately precede the making of the stroke. Your ritual should always be composed of the same physical motions executed in the same sequence and at the same rhythm (therefore taking exactly the same amount of time every time) before every putt you make on and off the course (under the heat of competition as well as in all your practice).

The purpose of the ritual is to get your mind and body into the automatic (subconscious control) mode. Executing your ritual on the golf course under pressure the same way you’ve done thousands of times before on the practice green and at home on your carpet lets your subconscious know both what you’re going to do and when you’re going to do it. It removes the necessity for any thinking or decision-making before or during the execution of your stroke.

The ritual should take less than five seconds. Why? Because you will have just seen and felt your preview (perfect) stroke and you lose about 30 percent of that feel within eight seconds after creating it. (And it will have taken you about three seconds to get set in your final putting address position after finalizing your preview stroke to be ready to start your ritual.)

You Must Move Your Body

The ritual can be simple but it cannot he mental. Your mind races when you’re excited. Your heart beats faster your brain tends to run faster and time seems to fly when you’re in the heat of competition. So you can’t simply count “one two three go” in your mind as your ritual. You must move your fingers hands arms

Establish Your Practice Framework 231 and/or body in a series of motions that you can see and feel. If these movements are out of rhythm you can abort the stroke by backing off walking away and starting all over again.

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

A number of very fine players putt with what I call the “power stroke ” by which I mean a stroke in which the power comes from the muscles of the hands wrists or forearms. Some power-strokers use their wrist muscles hinging their wrists the way Arnold Palmer did very successfully in the early part of his career (Figure 3.5.2). Another power-stroker Tiger Woods doesn’t break his wrists but supplies power with his arm muscles (Figure 3.5.3).

Both Arnold and Tiger like to force things to happen to control their putts and make them do what they want them to do. And we all know that they both have so much talent they perform this way very well. I think however they would both putt better if they used less hit and more stroke in their putting motions. (What do I mean? Have you ever seen Arnold or Tiger blow a short putt four feet past the hole? That’s what I mean.)

No matter what provides the power there are two big drawbacks to a power stroke. First is the likelihood of a “power surge ” which can be caused by adrenaline resulting from anxiety or excitement; this significantly degrades the touch of most players under pressure. Second is the uncertainty of controlling the wrist hinge if there is one when the muscles are tight under pressure. Either way consistency usually suffers.

Methods of Putting 43

Next down the easiness scale comes the “pop stroke ” which was used quite successfully by both Gary Player and Johnny Miller early in their careers. The backstroke is shorter than normal and there’s virtually no follow-through after impact so the ball is “popped ” or jabbed forward (Figure 3.5.4). Neither Miller nor Player stuck with the pop stroke through his career because they said it lacked consistency; when I’ve asked them about this method neither would recommend it. However both won many tournaments popping their putts so it may not be as bad as they recall.

The pop stroke does have one advantage and that is it keeps the putterface angle essentially square at all times which is a good thing. However it uses the muscles of the hands and arms for power and is therefore a difficult method to use if you want to develop really good touch.

One of the more interesting putting techniques in golf history is the so-called “hook stroke” of the great South African Bobby Locke who won more than 80 tournaments worldwide between the 1930s and ’50s including four British Opens. Many golfers have told me that Locke put hook spin on his putts which made them dive into the hole. That may have been what both they and Locke thought but I’m sure it was not the case.

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Darwen Golf Club

Now, I’ll take you into the follow-through. This will be simple. Basically just keep turning around your spine. If you have flipped your wrists correctly, you won’t have to bother too much with the follow through. However, there is a basic position that you should be in when you finish the swing. You should be facing the target, and your right and left forearms should be crossed. Your right forearm should be closest to you, and the club should be out towards left field.

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