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Golf Lessons at Dartmouth Golf Club

About Dartmouth Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Dartmouth Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Dartmouth Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Dartmouth Golf Club

Dartmouth Golf and Country ClubJust minutes from the historical town of Dartmouth and one of Devon’s premier golf courses & leisure resorts, Dartmouth Golf & Country Club offers excellent hotel & leisure facilities for the golfer and non golfer alike.An ideal location for a golf break or holiday, Dartmouth Golf & Country Club offers the very best in hotel accommodation and leisure facilities.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

This is very different from practice for the full swing where hitting balls at a driving range can provide benefits intuitively (when you make a good driver swing you see a good drive; when you make a good 8-iron swing you see a good 8-iron shot; when you make bad swings you see bad shots). A driving range is a relatively good learning environment for the full swing. However practicing putting is nothing like that. Most golfers miss putts when they’re “practicing” on a putting green and have no idea why. The reason is they ‘re not getting reliable helpful feedback and more practice doesn’t help the situation.

Outdoor Learning

Touch feel and green-reading must be learned outdoors on putting greens (real or artificial). Again good feedback is beneficial and you must get into the habit of

376 Wrap-Up evaluating the proper aspect of your results to provide it (Chapters 12 and 13 detail the drills and games to play).

It has been both interesting and informative to watch and experience how the staff at the Pelz Golf Institute learns what to expect balls to do on sloping greens. The more we test measure and identify slopes the easier it becomes for us to recognize them in our mind’s eye the next time we see them (before we even measure them). The more we measure and quantify green speeds the better we get at estimating how fast they are and how much putts will break on them before we actually roll any putts (Figure 15.3.2).

Spending time in this environment has not only improved my green-reading skills it has convinced me that all golfers can learn to read greens more accurately given a little time feedback and reference information. While my staff is constantly refining and learning about how golfers play the game we also see our concepts constantly being proven in our schools. As they work more and more with the tilt-greens True Rollers and other feedback devices they have begun to see and feel in their subconscious minds that reference slopes speed evaluations and focusing on visible break really does take hold and work. Even some of our nongolfing personnel have learned to read greens pretty well.

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

15 BUILDING BLOCKS OF THE PUTTING GAME

AIM FEEL PUTTER FITTING PATH FACE ANGLE POWER SOURCE TOUCH STABILITY I MPACT PATTERN RHYTHM ATTITUDE FLOW-LINES RITUAL ROUTINE GREEN-READING

Defining How the Ball Rolls

Before getting into the mechanics of the putting stroke I’ll define some vocabulary which will help keep things simple and easy to understand throughout the book. In our Scoring Game Schools we routinely use words or phrases that you may not be familiar with. We do this because we’ve found that many golfers refer to the same things using different terms and sometimes use the same terms to describe different things.

Obviously this can lead to unnecessary confusion and disagreement. It helps to be more explicit in how you describe and define some of these concepts. For ex ample my staff and I never talk about “putting to there ” or putting “that way.”

Rather we talk about the “Aimline” you intend to start the ball rolling on the “ini tial line” you actually start the ball on and where the “ball track” goes after that.

Ball-Hole Line and Target Line

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Dartmouth Golf Club

Here is a view from the front. The goal of this photo is to show that there is no lateral movement. Simply rotating your right shoulder around your spine.*Please note that you should NOT be cocking your wrists at the end of your backswing. While this may add a bit of power, it will totally throw off your timing. The results of a wrist cock are slices, hooks, fat shots, etc.

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