Darlington Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Darlington Golf Club

About Darlington Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Darlington Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Darlington Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Darlington Golf Club

Founded in 1908 and designed by Dr Alistair Mackenzie, the designer of the Augusta National, home of the US Masters, the 18-hole parkland course shares many similarities to the Masters ’ track. Huge rolling greens, lush, tree lined fairways and unforgiving semi rough challenges golfers of all abilities.Visitors from all over the country remark on the friendliness and warm welcome of the club and the members.After a tiring days golf relax in our Clubhouse where full bar and catering facilities are available, or weather permitting, sit on the patio and enjoy watching fellow golfers on the 10th green. The clubhouse opening hours vary depending on the time of year but if you have any special requirements or would like to hold an evening function, then please do not hesitate to contact us and we will do our best to accommodate you.

Darlington Golf Club

Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

Wind Lopsided Balls Dimples Rain Sleet and Snow 207

How to Measure the Heavy Side of a Ball

Once balls are marked always putt with the Balance-line aligned exactly with the Aim-li ne so balls roll in-balance and along the intended ball track.

How to Measure Golf Ball Balance

1 wide-mouth container (8 oz. Cool Whip container works well) 2½ cups lukewarm water 12 tbsp. Epsom salts (available at most grocery stores) 2 drops Jet Dry (a dishwater-despotting agent available at grocery stores) 1 permanent-ink marking pen without spinning. Let ball float to surface. After all motion ceases mark center of exposed ball cover with permanent marker. This mark identifies light side of ball (gravity pulls heavy side down).

9.10 Golf Balls Have Weird Feet

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 57 ball-hole line and try to imagine how far uphill to the right you must start your putt if you want to make it. You select an Aimline which runs about 28 inches outside the right edge of the hole you walk to the ball set up perfectly along your new Aimline and make practice strokes until ready. You execute the perfect stroke and your ball starts exactly on your Aimline. You guessed the right amount of break (28 inches) and gave your putt the perfect speed so as it rolls it breaks gently to the left and into the center of the cup. Your ball track formed the perfect arc (Figure 4.1.6) the ball entered the exact center of the hole (centered relative to the ball track) and all is right with the world.

4.2 Stroke Definitions

Where are you aiming? Sooner or later 1 ask that question of every golfer I work with. Aim is a critical aspect of putting (more on that later) and both you and I need to know not only where you are trying to aim (where you think you are aiming) but also where you are actually aiming your putter your stance and your stroke.

Technically when I refer to aim I am referring to a direction. The direction of your aim can be at a place like the edge of the hole or at an object such as a discolored piece of grass a spike mark or anything you can see and define. What you choose to aim at can be anywhere along your Aimline from just in front of the ball to alongside or even past the hole. Your aim can be one inch one ball three balls a foot or even 10 feet outside the right or left edge of the cup or it can be anywhere inside the cup. Only after you determine how much you expect your putt to break and define somewhere or something to aim at can the direction of your aim your Aimline be visualized located or marked on the green.

The track along which your putter travels is your “putter path. ” It can move straight back and straight through in-line with your Aimline it can cut across from outside-to-in or inside-to-out (shown in Figure 4.2.1) or it can loop around your Aimline. Golfers take their putters severely or slightly inside and outside their Aimlines waver along their Aimlines and sometimes incorporate a bit of all of the above into their putting paths. I believe there are almost as many distinct putter paths as there are golfers and I’m sure I haven’t seen them all.

Face Angle

A very important consideration is the putterface angle which we define as the angle between the perpendicular to your putterface and your Aimline (left side

Darlington Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Darlington Golf Club

Hold the club steady with your right hand, and place left hand underneath the club as shown. The first joint of the left forefinger should be directly on the bottom of the handle, as well as the last joint of your left pinky. Once you have placed your palm on top of the club, do the same with your left thumb. Place it directly on top of the handle of the club. Next, interlock the left forefinger, and the right pinky. Nudge your right hand all the way towards the bottom of the grip. Now again, wrap the right palm all the way around the top of the grip. Don’t hold the grip of the club in your right palm. You should be able to cover up your left thumb with your right palm if you’ve done it correctly. You’ll see another V-shape being made where your right thumb and right forefinger meet. As a check, this V should be pointing directly at your right shoulder. If it doesn’t point at your right shoulder, rotate your hand on the grip so that it does. Your fingers should be giving the club most of the support it needs, NOT your palms.

Darlington Golf Club