Dainton Park Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Dainton Park Golf Club

About Dainton Park Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Dainton Park Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Dainton Park Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Dainton Park Golf Club

Dainton Park is an established 6,400yd, par 71 undulating parkland course set in rolling South Devon countryside. Elevated tees, generous fairways lined with trees to catch the wayward, over 50 bunkers, water hazards on several holes and probably the toughest opening two holes in Devon combine to make the course a good, rewarding test of golf for all abilities.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

A final thought about putting feel and touch. It has always amused me when television commentators say “He has really good touch for a big man.” As I just noted great putting should have nothing to do with the size of the player’s body. No putting touch is the creation of practice techniques mind-set feel and stroke mechanics. Size of one’s body should have nothing to do with it. In fact if I had to guess I would say that in my lifetime tall golfers have probably putted better than short ones. Perhaps tall golfers tend to have more room to swing their arms naturally under their shoulders. Plus maybe they’ve grown up using short (short for them normal-length for most golfers) putters since that was all that was available so their arms and wrists tend to be extended rather than bent and cramped (Figure 5.11.1).

Regardless of whether or not this is true whether or not tall golfers really putt better as a group if I had to choose a team of the world’s best putters and they

Five Nonphysical Building Blocks: Touch Feel Attitude Routine and Ritual 131 all had to be either taller or shorter than six feet tall I would take the tall team. Just give me George Archer Bob Charles Raymond Floyd Andy North Brad Faxon Loren Roberts the late Payne Stewart Lee Janzen Steve Elkington and Colin Montgomerie and I wouldn’t be afraid to putt against anyone for anything.

Stability and Rhythm: Two Artistic Fundamentals

6.1 Where Science Meets Art

In the old days when I started talking in my schools about acceleration stability and rhythm in putting I realized that I had reached the place where science and art begin to meet. Golfers rarely understand how the concepts of stability and rhythm apply to golf and they think acceleration is something that applies only to race cars.

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

The Sweetspot

A common term in sports is “sweetspot.” Tennis players talk about hitting the sweetspot of the racquet; baseball players like to crack the ball on the sweetspot of the bat. Why? Because when contact is made there it feels good and maximum energy is transferred to the ball. The same is true for a putter in golf: The sweet-spot is that place where contact feels the most solid which eliminates all rotation and wobble of the putterhead at impact (Figure 4.9.1) and which transfers the maximum energy possible from the stroke to the ball. If you do everything correctly your impact point will be the sweetspot of your putter.

It is possible to miss the sweetspot either in the vertical plane (hitting the ball too high or too low on the face) or the horizontal plane (making contact toward the toe or the heel of the putter). Any of these misses by as little as a fraction of an inch results in a mis-hit and a loss of energy. But you don’t need to worry because in Chapter 12 I will show you how to measure and mark your putter sweetspot and then learn to hit the ball there repeatedly and consistently.

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 89

The Quality of Impact

Before we get there however I want you to learn how important your impact point is to your putting. Look at the impact patterns shown on the following two pages (Figure 4.9.2). These patterns are all authentic test results made by golfers on the first day in our Scoring Game Schools. Note they are arranged by handicap with the lowest handicaps at the top left down to the highest handicaps at the bottom right. Also note that the approximate location of the sweetspot of each putter is indicated by the line near the center of each impact tape.

If you study these patterns carefully the results are clear: The lower the handicap the smaller – and closer to the sweetspot – the impact pattern. In other words the better player hits putts closer to the same area of the putterface. And the best players – the Tour pros – have the smallest impact patterns centered on or very near the sweetspot. In fact looking at the consistent correlation between pattern size and handicap on these pages you might think that impact pattern size was the absolute determinant of a player’s ability to score. Of course this is not true but the implications of this data are undeniable.

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Dainton Park Golf Club

This is the final setup position. The back is still straight. All you need to do is bend at the waist until the club touches the ground. As you can see, the arms are still stretched out, and the hands are hanging straight down from the shoulders. They seem lower than waist-level, but the relationship between the arms and chest has not changed. Your legs remain in a fixed position, while you move the arms and chest together to the ball. This is the key to a good, simple setup.

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