Crews Hill Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Crews Hill Golf Club

About Crews Hill Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Crews Hill Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Crews Hill Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Crews Hill Golf Club

Originally designed in 1916 – Crews Hill Golf Club is a parkland course set in rural west Enfield, once the hunting ground to the Crown. Modern Crews Hill is less open, with many oak and silver birch trees defining well designed golf holes. Situated at the northern tip of Greater London, the area is now surrounded by garden nurseries and farmland. Crews Hill is often referred to as “The Jewel of the North!” and considered as the finest test of golf in Middlesex County.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

Let me explain what this “dead-hands” stroke is not. It is not your natural stroke because most golfers’ natural instinct is to “hit” a putt with the muscles of the fingers hands and wrists. Our instincts are developed in our childhood when we play games that involve hitting things turning knobs and manipulating pushing and controlling the objects in our lives with our fingers hands and wrists. This also is the way most people putt because they consider it to be natural. But just because it’s natural does not make it either the right way or the best way.

But golfers hit their putts (Figure 5.3.1). And when a ball is hit the distance it rolls depends on how hard it is hit. The power of the putt depends on the energy or effort put into the stroke. And therein lies the problem: You can’t see or feel the power of a hit before it happens. No matter how much a golfer practices hitting putts the right distance and speed when he or she gets under pressure and tries to apply the same hit to the ball with adrenaline-filled muscles the results will be wrong. Once again as the muscles get stronger the same feel that produced good results in practice produces a more powerful hit under pressure.

Many low-handicap amateurs fall into this trap. They practice with the belief that the harder and longer they work the better they’ll putt under pressure. They believe that putting well under pressure involves courage strength of conviction or some other inner quality of the heart. I suppose these character traits are admirable but they have nothing to do with how far the ball rolls in good putting. If you insist on hitting your putts and controlling your putt distance with your muscles then the only way to practice feel and touch is under pressure. The good player can accomplish this by playing in tournaments in which he is likely to face many pressure putts. Do enough of that – and enough is a lot – and you begin preparing yourself for future pressure situations. Higher-handicap golfers have a slightly different problem. Because hitting

Five Nonphysical Building Blocks: Touch Feel Attitude Routine and Ritual 117 with the hands is the natural way to putt most golfers begin by doing just that. The results won’t be very good but because the golfer is still new to the game poor putting will seem acceptable. It’s later as these golfers improve their ball-striking and short games and work on bringing their handicaps down that their natural (hand-muscle-controlled) putting stroke limits their ability to score.

The Amateurs Proved It

Let me give you one more problem with “hitting” your putts: It’s an inaccurate way to control the power transmitted to the ball. We measured this (Figure 5.3.2) when we tested the putting strokes of some 150 amateurs at the DuPont World Amateur tournament by measuring the length of their strokes when they putted. The averaged results show (Figure 5.3.3) that the length of their backswings varied only about 6 inches while the length of the putts produced varied from 6 to 30 feet (on a flat putting surface of 9.0 green speed). This means their backswing the power generator of the pulling stroke varied only 6 inches for 24 feet or about one-quarter inch per foot.

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

That gives them a chance to go in and the longest ones will probably stop near enough to the hole to leave no-brainers coming back.

Now look at the bottom of Figure 2.6.5 to see how far these same putts roll given the same amount of starting energy on a straight downhill putt. There ‘s a big difference from the level and uphill putts. Of course each downhill putt rolls farther but more important the spread of distances between balls has increased meaning the roll distance is more sensitive to energy input. Now the distance between the longest and shortest balls is 18 feet. So your downhill stroke has to be about three times more precise than your uphill stroke to stop a putt at the right distance. When putting downhill make a stroke of the wrong speed and you’ll have trouble making your next putt.

I’m not saying that understanding putting like this will make you a great putter. But I am saying that understanding nature’s rules and where the dangers lie in putting can help you be a better putter. And not understanding what putting is all about will make it even more difficult for you to learn to putt well.

So if you don’t know that downhill putts break more than uphill putts on the same slope (covered in Chapter 7) then you won’t be making many downhill-breaking putts. Or if you believe that Bobby Locke and Ben Crenshaw struck their putts with overspin to make them dive into the hole then it’s unlikely that you’ll work on those aspects of your putting that actually can help you putt better (see section 4.9).

It might seem about now that I’m being very negative about putting that I’m pointing out how hard it is how much you don’t know and how much you have to learn to be a good putter. I’m not trying to he negative but I am trying to point out how much you have to learn. Learning is what good putting is all about: It’s not hard to putt well; it is hard to learn how to putt well. And the difference is crucial. I place much of the blame for the difficulty in learning squarely on the putting green. The green provides a very poor environment in which to learn.

Standing on the putting green golfers have no idea why they miss putts or why they make them. After missing a putt (even on the practice green) most golfers assume their stroke mechanics were to blame. However they may have stroked a perfect putt but it hit a hard-to-see footprint which caused the putt to miss the hole. Or they might make a putt and assume they stroked it perfectly when they actually hit a terrible putt but misread it just the right amount to compensate and – only luck can explain it – roll it into the hole.

I learned a long time ago that if you learn from your mistakes things usually get better. But if you continue to repeat the same mistakes over and over again things get pretty bad. Then I read a book on learning theory and learned that immediate accurate reliable feedback is the key to efficient learning (Figure 2.7.1). This in fact has become the basis of all my teaching (I wrote about it at great length in my Short Game Bible). The basic notion is that if you don’t know right from wrong in practice there is no way you can improve. If you don’t know a good stroke from a bad stroke in practice you are just as likely to groove the bad one as the better one. If you make a perfect putting stroke from a bad setup position and then blame your miss on stroke path you’ll never learn to set up perfectly. Or if you blame your heart your courage or your self-worth when you miss putts then you’ll never fix your aim your path or the impact problems that truly are at fault.

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Crews Hill Golf Club

Hold the club steady with your right hand, and place left hand underneath the club as shown. The first joint of the left forefinger should be directly on the bottom of the handle, as well as the last joint of your left pinky. Once you have placed your palm on top of the club, do the same with your left thumb. Place it directly on top of the handle of the club. Next, interlock the left forefinger, and the right pinky. Nudge your right hand all the way towards the bottom of the grip. Now again, wrap the right palm all the way around the top of the grip. Don’t hold the grip of the club in your right palm. You should be able to cover up your left thumb with your right palm if you’ve done it correctly. You’ll see another V-shape being made where your right thumb and right forefinger meet. As a check, this V should be pointing directly at your right shoulder. If it doesn’t point at your right shoulder, rotate your hand on the grip so that it does. Your fingers should be giving the club most of the support it needs, NOT your palms.

Crews Hill Golf Club