Coxmoor Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Coxmoor Golf Club

About Coxmoor Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Coxmoor Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Coxmoor Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Coxmoor Golf Club

Coxmoor’s golf course continues to develop with further improvements to the course taking place over the winter months. For members and visitors alike, Coxmoor offers value for money teamed with exceedingly high quality. We pride ourselves in the complete package Coxmoor offers, that of a fair and challenging test of golfing prowess over a heathland course with superb views.A hearty welcome in the clubhouse with a selection of traditional beers, to excellent home made meals provided by our Chef and his staff. When this is complemented by our top class team of professionals, including David Ridley, Midlands EGU coach and personal coach to Greg Owen our tour professional, I think “Golfing at Coxmoor” is comparable to any championship course in the country.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

Establish Your Practice Framework 253

Occasionally uninformed golfers mistakenly refer to left-hand-low as “crosshanded” putting but a true crossed-handed grip (which I never recommend to anyone) is shown in Figure 11.6.14. Left-hand-low doesn’t work only for the pros. Only four years after taking up the game a young man named Bob Zeigenfuss (Figure 11.6.15) made the world finals of the 1997 World Putting Championship putting left-hand-low.

254 Establish Your Practice Framework

Langer (center) and Fred Couples (right plus inset) demonstrate their “left-hand-low” grips. Annika Sorenstam Vijay Singh Jim Furyk Karrie Webb Bob Estes and Se Ri Pak are among the other great players who putt this way.

My Man Rocky Now if you really want to talk about an unusual putting grip you’ve got to meet my friend Bill Rockwell. Rocky (Figure 11.6.16) is one of the most inspirational people I’ve ever met. He lost his left arm and the use of his right arm in a motor

Establish Your Practice Framework 255 cycle accident a number of years ago. He watched the 1996 WPC competition on ESPN and said “I can do that ” so he bought a putter and tried putting for the first time. In July 1997 he won the putting championship at his local club then qualified regionally for the WPC Finals. He finished 155th (in a field of 308) in the 1997 World Putting Championship beating a number of PGA Tour professionals along the way. Ask him how he does it and Rocky answers “Just like you do: I grab my putter and put the best stroke I can muster on every putt.” I can tell you from studying his stroke that it’s a good one. His “big-toe-right-foot ” grip definitely keeps his putter square through impact!

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

5.2 Touch and Feel Are in the Mind’s Eye

The skill bases for your touch and feel (green-reading will be discussed in Chapter 7) are intermingled in your mind. They are also intermingled in that they have a combined effect on putting results. But each is a separate skill which can be learned and developed over time.

Touch is in your head but it begins with knowing what your putt looks like and remembering (knowing based on past experience) how much power (the size or intensity of stroke) was required in the past for similar putts. Touch is an acquired skill based on past experiences. It resides in your memory bank and plays a part in creating the mind’s-eye picture of the size of stroke you need.

Before you can develop a good feel for a putt you need to have a good idea for how long it is and how much power will be required to roll it the proper speed and distance: In other words you need to have touch. Given that feel for the putt involves having a good idea of how to apply the power which will be needed to roll the ball at the optimum speed along that line to allow it to break into the hole. Having good feel for a putt is having the idea or picture in your mind’s eye of how the stroke will look and feel in both rhythm and intensity as it rolls the ball to the hole. So a part of feel is in your head. Feel also involves a kinesthetic awareness for the violence (or nonviolence) of your swing and knowing the physical sensation to expect at impact including the vibrations that will travel up the shaft after the putter strikes the ball. It is based on the feel of your collected experience from thousands of swings you’ve made on previous putts and the results they produced. This feel is produced in your nerve endings fingers arms and shoulders in the muscles of all of these entities as well as in your brain and memory.

Is one part of feel more important than any other? I don’t know. But more to the point I’m not sure I care. Because I do know that all these factors are necessary for good putting and the end result feel ultimately is experiential. You’ve got to do it lots of times to learn it and know it.

Feel is knowing how to do it touch is knowing what to do. A golfer with good touch can have a had day physically when his body simply can ‘t execute what his brain knows he should do. On a day like this we’d say his feel is off. This golfer will be frustrated because he doesn’t seem to be able to do what he knows he can and needs to do. Compare that to a golfer with poor touch: He can have great feel and still never make a putt because if you choose the wrong speed yet roll it perfectly at that speed the results still won ‘t be very good. So poor-touch golfers are more likely to get bewildered than frustrated (Figure 5.2.1).

Five Nonphysical Building Blocks: Touch Feel Attitude Routine and Ritual 115

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Coxmoor Golf Club

The follow through is now complete. The forearms are completely crossed, showing that you have gotten your hands through the ball. It may take a few days to get used to this new “left elbow close-to-side, forearms crossed-at-finish” concept. It will come though. It’s one of the best things you can do for your golf swing. No more blocking to the right or uncontrollably slicing the ball!

Coxmoor Golf Club